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If Only for a Moment

Rate It! Avg: 5.0 (4 ratings)
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If Only for a Moment album cover
01
Peace Loving Man
4:54
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02
Kiss of Confusion
4:45
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03
Listen to the Silence
4:50
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04
Love Bomb
7:39
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05
Billy Boo the Gunman
7:09
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06
Indian Summer
5:56
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07
Just Above My Hobby Horse's Head
2:54
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08
Wait a Minute
5:52
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 8   Total Length: 43:59

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Great 60s music!

rschryer

I agree with jakesdad - this is excellent, soul-infused 60s British psychedelia without being too poppy or too 'far-out, man'. Not quite up there with The Pretty Things' output, but close. Get this and The Pretty Things' S.F. Sorrow and Parachute and your life will be that much more complete.

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One of my best-ever albums since 1969

jakesdad

I am almost speechless with amazement that not one eMU member has rated this outstanding production from this sadly short-lived underground/psychedelic band. I remember buying this album after seeing the Toes live at the London Roundhouse in 1969 and it still delivers in full to this day! Even the AMG review is way short of the mark IMHO.

They Say All Music Guide

Brian Godding and Jim Cregan were still Blossom Toes’ chief songwriters on their second album, but the LP stands in bold contrast to their debut in sound and attitude. Having scuttled the orchestras and developed their chops in the two-year interlude, the record bears the influence of heavy California psychedelia and Captain Beefheart with its intricate, interwoven guitar lines and occasional gruff dissonance. The more serious instrumental approach spills over to the lyrics, which are somber and at times even gloomy, occasionally reflecting the social turbulence of the late ’60s, with their uncertain tenor and references to ominous “peace loving men” and “love bombs.” Far less uplifting than their debut, the weighty approach is leavened by the close harmonies and sparkling guitar interplay. While not as memorable as the first album, it’s above-average late-’60s psychedelia that almost acts as the downer flip side to the stoned, happy-face ambience of their early work. – Richie Unterberger

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