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Christmas In The Heart

Rate It! Avg: 3.5 (77 ratings)
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Christmas In The Heart album cover
01
Here Comes Santa Claus
2:35
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02
Do You Hear What I Hear?
3:02
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03
Winter Wonderland
1:52
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04
Hark the Herald Angels Sing
2:31
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05
I'll Be Home for Christmas
2:54
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06
Little Drummer Boy
2:52
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07
The Christmas Blues
2:54
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08
O' Come All Ye Faithful (Adeste Fideles)
2:48
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09
Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas
4:06
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10
It Must Be Santa
2:48
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11
Silver Bells
2:35
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12
The First Noel
2:30
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13
Christmas Island
2:27
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14
The Christmas Song
3:56
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15
O' Little Town of Bethlehem
2:18
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 15   Total Length: 42:08

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Wondering Sound

Review 1

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Douglas Wolk

Contributor

Douglas Wolk writes about pop music and comic books for Time, the New York Times, Rolling Stone, Wired and elsewhere. He's the author of Reading Comics: How Gra...more »

12.07.11
A hoot, with Uncle Bob grinning from one edge of his fake beard to the other
2009 | Label: Columbia

If you’re scratching your head at the idea of this legendarily iconoclastic Jewish-turned-fundamentalist-Christian-turned-who-knows-what songwriter (with one of the unloveliest singing voices around) recording a Christmas album, look at it this way: Dylan loves the dusty old fairgrounds of the Great American Songbook, and the carefully crafted songwriting era that ended around the time he started making records. Dylan loves hokum and corniness and schmaltz. He usually puts quotation marks around them in his own work,… read more »

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Christmas In The Heart

christopherrwilson

Almost any lyrics rendered by Zimmy from any genre have a soul to soul appeal. OORA OORA. There may be a "Woman on my block who wonders who's gonna take away their license to kill" but she is listening to the "tripping reels of rhyme" with "one hand waving free". God speed Bob-be "forever young" and watch those parking meters.

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This is the greatest Christmas album ever

Linky

I am not into Christmas albums but this one is awesome in every way. At once pretty and hilarious, Dylan's interpretation of these songs seems nearly inspired by Satchmo himself. It's fun. Get it and smile while waiting for Santa and drinking something in a glass with a stem.

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They Say All Music Guide

After the initial shock fades, the existence of Christmas in the Heart seems perhaps inevitable. After all, the thing Bob Dylan loves most of all are songs that are handed down from generation to generation, songs that are part of the American fabric, songs so common they never seem to have been written. These are the songs Dylan chooses to sing on Christmas in the Heart, a cheerfully old-fashioned holiday album from its Norman Rockwell-esque cover to its joyous backing vocals. Apart from the breakneck “Must Be Santa,” which barrelhouses like a barroom, Dylan doesn’t really reinterpret these songs as much as simply play them with his crackerjack road band, dropping in a little flair — restoring “we’ll have to muddle through somehow” to “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas,” singing the opening of “O Come All Ye Faithful” in its original Latin — but never pushing tunes in unexpected directions. Many would argue having Dylan croon these carols is unexpected enough and, true, there are times his gravelly rumble is a bit pronounced, but nothing here feels forced, it all feels rather fun, provided you’re on the same wavelength as latter-day Bob, where the sound and swing of the band is as important as the song, where there’s an undeniable nostalgic undertow to all the proceedings. And, of course, there’s no better time for celebratory sound, swing, and nostalgia than the holidays, which may be why Christmas in the Heart is a bit of a left-field delight. – Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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