|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

Body Of Song

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (249 ratings)
Retail
Member
Body Of Song album cover
01
Circles
3:56
$0.69
$0.99
02
(Shine Your) Light Love Hope
3:58
$0.69
$0.99
03
Paralyzed
3:54
$0.69
$0.99
04
I Am Vision, I Am Sound
3:49
$0.69
$0.99
05
Underneath Days
4:33
$0.69
$0.99
06
Always Tomorrow
3:59
$0.69
$0.99
07
Days Of Rain
5:05
$0.69
$0.99
08
Best Thing
2:51
$0.69
$0.99
09
High Fidelity
3:48
$0.69
$0.99
10
Missing You
2:50
$0.69
$0.99
11
Gauze Of Friendship
5:30
$0.69
$0.99
12
Beating Heart Of Prize
6:31
$0.69
$0.99
Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 50:44

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Write a Review 13 Member Reviews

Please register before you review a release. Register

user avatar

Local Boy makes good

Sank63

And rocks the house as well!

user avatar

Good S**T

MonsterDad

I agree, this is good stuff. Not Husker Du, not Sugar, but well-craft songs, great production.

user avatar

hmmm...

childsupport

I'm a bit partial to loud noisy Bob, but he's a master of writing cranking pop. This seems all over the place. I bet if this album had come from some pretty 19 year old boys with special hair and tats it would have been at the top of the 1995 pop/emo heap.

user avatar

Just good

zzoeller

There are some great songs here, but I just can't get past the vocoder. Grillboy, do all of your reviews come straight from www.allmusic.com??

user avatar

it hurts...

pabs138

I punched myself and it hurts. I saw Sugar on their first tour but was too young to see Husker Du. This sounds like the "good" Bob. C'mon,y'all know know what I'm talking about. Bob can make some sorry shit or he can make some awesome shit. This is good. When Bob makes good, it is great.

user avatar

The drums define this album.

J-Lo

This is a fine Bob Mould album, but what sets it far apart from others is its visceral drumming by Brendan Canty. On every album since Sugar's debut, Bob's drums have been mechanical or electronic--until now. If you missed Bob playing Sugar songs with Mr. Canty on tour, punch yourself in the groin.

user avatar

Bob is SO back

Grillboy

In 1998 (much to the chagrin of the vast majority his fans) Mould announced he was hanging up his electric guitar and embracing electronic music. Then came Modulate, which made good on his threat/promise of a new direction with its drum machine, blips and beats, and vocoder processed vocals. While it was not well received among fans, I personally enjoyed the album and it even reminded me a bit of Todd Rungren’s more electronic efforts. Mould was still writing amazing songs, just delivering them a little differently. Then comes Body of Song, proclaiming in a big way that Bob is back. He hasn’t kicked the electronica bug entirely, but he hasn’t sounded this good in years. His trademark swarm of bees guitar sears through many of the tracks and so does his attitude. In particular, Paralyzed and Underneath Days herald the return of “Bitter Bob” with some of the most venomous lyrics I have heard for a while.

user avatar

Mould Modernized

MrFike

To me this album seems the most logical progression from Mould's stellar solo debut 'Workbook', notwithstanding over a dozen years and 4 other excellent offerings, both solo and with Sugar. Very introspective, personal and revealing and intense, 'Body of Song' definitely meets and seemingly surpasses the high standards that he's always set for himself and those helping him make music. The sound is a mixed bag from a nearly acoustic "High Fidelity" to the raging yet melodic, Husker Du-ish "Mising You". Of course the production is impeccable as Du/Mould/Sugar fans have come to expect since the Flip/Candy Apple days. Mould's songwriting has evolved and become a little more revealing and focused, though sometimes this might mean obsessive or single-minded. The guitar sound is impeccable and precisely executed noise. There's so much more to say here, but for the sake of brevity: Perfect.

user avatar

Bit of a let-down Bob

IndieKidEzzy

As a huge fan of Husker Du, Sugar, and Bob's previous records (er, except Modulate - wasn't keen...) this came as something of a let-down. Maybe it's me, as the knowledgeable EMu throng seem to like it. Sorry Bob - I'll try harder!

user avatar

Fave single

bigdaddy

"(Shine Your) Light Love Hope" has been one of my faves for weeks now. It's helping to save the vocoder from Cher, for one thing.

eMusic Features

0

Folk Goes Punk

By Peter Blackstock, Contributor

How exactly does one identify "folk-punk"? There's no easy answer, as different artists within the subgenre's horizons arrived at its intersection via different journeys. One could argue that Woody Guthrie was not only the original folkie but also the original folk-punker; look no further than the iconic photo of Woody with a guitar bearing the slogan "This Machine Kills Fascists." Boiled to its essence, folk punk is generally tradition-based acoustic music delivered with a forceful… more »

0

Icon: Husker Du

By Ira Robbins, Contributor

The three monumental bands who put Minneapolis on the indie rock map in the 1980s - the Replacements, Soul Asylum and Husker Du - all found greatness along the same path, climbing out of hardcore's narrow trench with ambitions far beyond the basics of simply railing against Reagan or bitching about school and cops. Of the three, Husker Du clung most tightly to punk's visceral force, but added sensitivity, melody or depth to the roar. Bob… more »

0

Icon: Husker Du

By Ira Robbins, Contributor

The three monumental bands who put Minneapolis on the indie rock map in the 1980s - the Replacements, Soul Asylum and Husker Du - all found greatness along the same path, climbing out of hardcore's narrow trench with ambitions far beyond the basics of simply railing against Reagan or bitching about school and cops. Of the three, Husker Du clung most tightly to punk's visceral force, but added sensitivity, melody or depth to the roar. Bob… more »

They Say All Music Guide

In 1998, after the release of his album The Last Dog and Pony Show, Bob Mould announced he was hanging up his electric guitar and exploring other musical avenues outside of rock & roll. More than a few fans expressed some trepidation about Mould’s career choice, and that buzz became a roar after Mould released Modulate in 2002, which found him diving head first into electronic music. At least in America, the vast majority of rock fans have not been able to come to terms with the rise of electronica, and regardless of the album’s virtues or flaws, few listeners were willing to look past the hard, kinetic surfaces of the music and give the songs a fair hearing. It would appear this prejudice did not escape Mould’s notice, as 2005′s Body of Song was widely hyped as Mould’s return to rock, complete with electric guitars and a live rhythm section. But a spin of the album suggests the album isn’t so much a step back to the sound he pioneered in Hüsker Dü and Sugar as an attempt to have things both ways. (The fact that Mould spins regularly at a dance club in Washington, D.C., suggests he hasn’t lost interest in electronic music as a creative form.) Many of the cuts on Body of Song sound as if Mould is still thinking club music, but is filtering it through the framework of a three-piece rock band; “(Shine Your) Light Love Hope,” “Always Tomorrow,” and “I Am Vision, I Am Sound” are dominated by echoed textures, lockstep rhythms, and vocoder-processed vocals that wouldn’t be out of place on a house track, but with a live drummer (Brendan Canty from Fugazi on most tracks, who is predictably excellent) and Mould adding a layer of guitar over the top. And while Mould frequently bellows his lyrics with an approximation of the fury of his best-known work, most of the songs on Body of Song deal with deeply problematic relationships and on paper speak more of sorrow, confusion, and misplaced hope than the rage suggested by the bitter wailing he uses to bring them across. Body of Song ultimately feels more like an attempt by Mould to please both his audience and himself than a coherent and confident effort; while it’s hardly a failure, it lacks the courage of the admittedly flawed Modulate while falling short of the power of his masterpieces with Sugar and Hüsker Dü, existing in a strange middle ground that doesn’t do this talented artist many favors, though there’s enough emotional resonance in quieter tunes such as “High Fidelity” and “Gauze of Friendship” to remind you he still has plenty to offer when he knows where he’s going. – Mark Deming

more »