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LUX

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (19 ratings)
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LUX album cover
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LUX 1
19:21  
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LUX 2
18:14  
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LUX 3
19:19  
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LUX 4
18:28  
Album Information

Total Tracks: 4   Total Length: 75:22

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Wondering Sound

Review 2

Andrew Parks

Contributor

When he's not filing news stories, shooting a live show or contributing the occasional feature for Wondering Sound, Andrew Parks edits and publishes self-titled...more »

11.13.12
Brian Eno, LUX
2012 | Label: Warp Records

Well it’s about goddamn time. After years of padding his already-ridiculous resume – dude’s down with Bowie, Bono and Byrne, not to mention Robert Fripp, Cluster and Coldplay – with such experimental flourishes as a shambolic poetry slam (Drums Between the Bells) and “film manipulations” for Daníel Bjarnason and Ben Frost (Music For Solaris), Brian Eno has finally given his fans what they’ve wanted all along: Music For Airports! Part Deux. Or LUX for short,… read more »

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Maybe Expectations Too High

MusicLab

I wanted to love this. Ever since the days of "No Pussyfooting" with Fripp, "Music for Airports" as well as the penultimate "Evening Star, " there is little doubt that Eno's work is the paragon, if not definer, of the genre. "Lux" does have the lilting repetitive loops of those classics, but there is a wavering, inconclusive appeal to this album that does not sit well with me. It has a Steve Roach feel or something from a movie soundtrack that suggests unease or unresolved emotions. To me, it hangs there and looks for resolution but rarely finds it. It is unlike Fripp's dissonance in King Crimson that ultimately was resolved by crescendo or transition into something fully melodic or tranquil. Here, with "Lux" I don't get that. I still feel like I am hanging...

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Return to Formlessness

Muse8

A return to the formlessness of Eno's classic ambient albums of the 70s, like Music for Airports and Thursday Afternoon. Gentle, lilting, unsynced loops and phrases form never-repeating patterns. Hypnotic, enchanting, wondrous. This is classical music for the future. Highest recommendation.

eMusic Features

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Who Is…Oneohtrix Point Never

By Marissa G. Muller, Contributor

Despite his stoner demeanor, Oneohtrix Point Never's Daniel Lopatin is as thoughtful in conversation as he is on tape. His abstract synthpop outfit's sixth full-length, Replica, is built from snippets of '80s commercials, gauzy loops and an almost-scientific curiosity about what music is. Though he says they're mostly improvised, Lopatin's instrumental meditations feel deliberate. Using DVD compilations of old ads as opposed to user-directed YouTube searches for specific words, Lopatin sought out to create Replica… more »

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Six Degrees of Brian Eno’s Another Green World

By Richard Gehr, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Brian Eno’s Another Green World

By Richard Gehr, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Byrne and Eno: Bullish On Sound

By Robert Phoenix, Contributor

Many years ago, I used to pen a monthly column for eMusic called Sounds Of The Stars, in which I attempted to bridge the gap between astrology and music. I did my best to approximate the sounds of various signs, and to suggest artists that might represent a certain aspect of a sign - even if the artist might not actually be the sign in question. We did a 365-day spin around the sun on… more »