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Inner City Front (Deluxe Edition)

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (29 ratings)
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Inner City Front (Deluxe Edition) album cover
01
You Pay Your Money And You Take Your Chance
4:21
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02
The Strong One
6:06
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03
All's Quiet On The Inner City Front
5:33
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04
Radio Shoes
4:18
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05
Wanna Go Walking
2:55
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06
And We Dance
4:47
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07
Justice
4:51
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08
Broken Wheel
4:41
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09
Loner
7:43
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10
The Coldest Night Of The Year
4:04
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11
The Light Goes On Forever
6:51
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 56:10

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A matter if taste

samaraofseil

Goes to prove that music is so often just a matter of taste. For me, while it's still got some great songs and in particular the opening track, the production hasn't weathered as well of some of his acoustic or more rhythmically interesting albums. And as for the "urban toughness" mentioned in the All Music review? Nnnoooooo .....

user avatar

A favorite

Lacunar

I have always thought this was one of his best albums.

They Say All Music Guide

Inner City Front continues the urban toughness that moved to the forefront on Bruce Cockburn’s previous release, Humans. Furthermore, like that record, there’s an uneasiness that runs throughout, from the jazz-tinged opener, “You Pay Your Money and You Take Your Chance,” to the disquieting “Loner,” which closes the album. Even a love song like “Wanna Go Walking,” one of the most straightforward rockers he’s ever recorded, reflects the weight of the outside world. Only the jazzy instrumental “Radio Shoes” and the joyful “And We Dance” remain free of this underlying tension. Musically, moody synths, violin, and woodwinds on Inner City Front underscore the dark, reflective nature of the material, which like its predecessor, deals with the “paradox and contrast” in the human condition, from personal relationships to world affairs. Also, for the second consecutive recording, Cockburn eschews the folkier, acoustic leanings of his ’70s work and places both feet squarely into the jazz and worldbeat rock that dominated the majority of Humans. One track, “The Strong One,” is even given a slow, brooding, techno treatment. Since the release of In the Falling Dark, Cockburn was gaining creative momentum with each release, and Inner City Front continues that trend. – Brett Hartenbach

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