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Flight of the Knife

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (17 ratings)
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Flight of the Knife album cover
01
Flight of the Knife (part 1)
5:38
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02
Venus Ambassador
4:21
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03
Imitation of the Sky
4:03
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04
La Madame On the Moon
2:42
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05
The Fire-tree Bird
3:58
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06
The Curious Disappearance of the Sky-ship Thunder Man
4:49
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07
The Purple Rocket
4:16
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08
The Zero Light
5:17
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09
Mama Waits
2:45
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10
Son of Stab
3:35
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11
Heaven On a Bird
4:48
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12
Flight of the Knife (part 2)
3:35
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 49:47

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They Say All Music Guide

Despite being titled Bryan Scary & the Shredding Tears, the debut album by Brooklyn-based singer and keyboardist Scary was mostly a one-man band release recorded piecemeal over the course of several years. That kind of album can often spiral into self-indulgence, and at times, Bryan Scary & the Shredding Tears threatened to do just that, though it mostly stayed on the right side of that line. Finally forming a proper band of that name, Bryan Scary returns with the far superior Flight of the Knife, an intoxicating blend of pop hooks spanning decades’ worth of influences. These 12 songs are built on the same basic set of touchstones as the debut: Paul McCartney & Wings (the super-catchy chorus of “Venus Ambassador” makes a passing reference to “Venus and Mars”), Electric Light Orchestra (the climax of “The Fire Tree Bird” echoes Jeff Lynne’s trademark blend of prog rock flash and British Invasion hooks), Sparks (Scary’s fondness for odd metaphors and prolix verses is akin to Ron Mael’s), Squeeze (Scary’s singing voice is often a dead-ringer for Glenn Tilbrook’s), and the Olivia Tremor Control (now’s as good a time as any to mention that Flight of the Knife, bracketed by the two-part title track, purports to be a sci-fi concept album about the greatest of all flying machines), among many others. The difference this time is that whereas Scary’s songs on the debut sometimes sounded like they were overtly indebted to those influences and predecessors, the far more cohesive Flight of the Knife is more like a patchwork quilt where some of the fabric scraps are immediately identifiable — check the Beach Boys-go-Devo pastiche in the second half of “The Purple Rocket”! — but they’re arranged in a harmonious and unique whole. Scary’s backing band, plus guests on violin and saxophone, give Flight of the Knife a more spacious, natural sound than the hermetic one-man-band debut could muster, which both just generally makes the album sound better and increases its sonic similarity to the vintage ’70s pop and art-rock albums it so closely resembles. A tremendously fun album, Flight of the Knife more than delivers on the promise of Bryan Scary & the Shredding Tears’ debut. – Stewart Mason

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