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Calling Rastafari

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01
As It Is
4:52
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02
Hallelujah(Extended Mix)
6:33
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03
House Of Reggae
4:39
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04
Let's Move
4:40
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05
Brighten My Vision
4:47
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06
You Want Me To
5:01
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07
Calling Rastafari
3:48
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08
Sons Of He (Extended Mix)
5:52
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09
Statue Of Liberty
3:38
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10
Own Security
4:25
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11
Holy Man (Extended Mix)
5:48
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12
Unreleased Original Reservation *
4:21
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13
Unreleased Original Reservation (Dub Mix)*
4:03
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 13   Total Length: 62:27

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eMusic Features

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Reggae’s Ba-Ba Boom Time

By Lenny Kaye, Contributor

Despite the fire and brimstone that characterized reggae's revolutionary emergence in the 1970s, I have always had an abiding affection for the evolutionary period that immediately preceded that breakthrough, when the music seemed caught between two worlds. The style is usually referred to as rocksteady - post-Ska, but still experimenting with and expanding the possibilities of that one-drop, loping afterbeat; and though Rastafarian ideology was already beginning to swiftly gospelize the music (anthemed most notably… more »

They Say All Music Guide

By this time Burning Spear’s sound is well established: slow, smoky roots reggae grooves embellished by horns and featuring little or no melody; in its place is Winston Rodney’s hypnotic speak-singing, a relatively tuneless chant that invariably delivers messages of spiritual uplift, political resistance and social discipline. On his latest outing, Rodney does not departs at all from his usual approach, which in lesser artists might be seen as a sign of stagnation, but in his case just sounds like virtuous consistency. The program opens with “As It Is,” which recycles Spear’s classic “Marcus Garvey” with new (and unfortunately self-referential) lyrics. Things improve immediately with the sweet and quietly propulsive “Hallelujah” and the surprisingly tuneful “House of Reggae.” “Statue of Liberty” combines a biting criticism of American immigration policy with percolating guitar, a funky horn line, and a martial rockers beat. The album ends with an extended mix of “Holy Man,” a horn-heavy paean to Haile Selassie. The Burning Band is rock solid throughout. Highly recommended. – Rick Anderson

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