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Own Side Now

Rate It! Avg: 5.0 (12 ratings)
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Own Side Now album cover
01
Learning to Ride
4:30
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02
Own Side
3:57
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03
For the Rabbits
4:52
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04
Shanghai Cigarettes
3:52
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05
New York
4:48
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06
Spare Me (Fetzer's Blues)
3:44
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07
Things Change
5:57
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08
That's Alright
4:23
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09
Sunful Wishing Well
4:22
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10
Coming Up
5:26
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 10   Total Length: 45:51

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Just Okay!

TheNewKid

This young lady is a lot better in concert. If you get a chance to catch a live show, by all means do it. As far as the studio album, it is just okay.

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Caitlin Rose Own Side Now

hughca

I saw her play at the Bestival 2011 and she was fantastic. This album is almost perfect and along with the John Grant album (who also played the Bestival) it is one of my favourite downloads. Download it all!!

They Say All Music Guide

As is so often the case with American artists whose appeal isn’t exactly straight down the middle, Caitlin Rose was initially more successful overseas than in her homeland. But it’s not as tragic a tale as it might sound, since “initially” refers only to the period of time during which her entire output consisted of her debut EP, Dead Flowers. The arrival of the young singer/songwriter’s first full-length release, Own Side Now, represents a chance for Rose’s sound to find wider acceptance stateside. Don’t be misled by the stylish image on the front cover, which might lead you to conclude that Rose is some sort of Zooey Deschanel-esque ingénue peddling overly precious goods; the Nashville native needs no M. Ward to fill in the artistic gaps for her. Rose’s own songwriting gifts are on ample display throughout Own Side Now, with lyrics that show a knack for poetic turns and artful understatement in equal measure — a combination too seldom found in young songwriters’ work — and humble but hummable melodies that make the most of her grounding in both alt-country and pop. Interestingly, while most of the album mines a gently twangy Americana feel, one of the most overtly country-ish moments comes with a cover of the Stevie Nicks-penned Fleetwood Mac track “That’s Alright.” As it turns out, Rose’s lissome croon carries the tune with more élan than the original version, so maybe she’s got something to say to the classic-rock crowd too. – James Allen

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