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Come Home With Me

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Come Home With Me album cover
01
Intro (Cam'ron/Come Home With Me)
2:45
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02
Losing Weight Part 2
6:06
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03
Oh Boy
3:25
$0.79
$1.29
04
Live My Life (Leave Me Alone)
3:12
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05
Daydreaming
6:29
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06
Come Home With Me
5:02
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07
Welcome To New York City
5:10
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08
Hey Ma
3:41
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09
On Fire Tonight
5:40
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10
Stop Calling
6:06
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11
I Just Wanna
4:09
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12
Dead Or Alive
4:07
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13
The Roc (Just Fire)
4:25
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14
Boy Boy
4:44
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15
Tomorrow
4:20
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Album Information
EXPLICIT

Total Tracks: 15   Total Length: 69:21

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Wondering Sound

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Jayson Greene

Senior Editor

Jayson Greene is Senior Editor at Wondering Sound and a contributing editor and columnist at Pitchfork. His writing has also appeared in GQ, the Village Voice,

11.16.10
His closest bout with rap superstardom
2002 | Label: Roc-A-Fella

Cam'ron has always been a little too weird, too bored, too dissatisfied to make a concerted go at rap superstardom, but Come Home With Me is the closest he ever came. The record was his debut on Roc-A-Fella following a mostly unfruitful stint at Epic Records, and two happy developments coincided to make Come Home With Me platinum. One: Cam'ron finally figured out what kind of stylist he wanted to be. His slip-siding rap style,… read more »

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Six Degrees of Araabmuzik’s Electronic Dream

By Andy Battaglia, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Just when seemed as if everyone had forgotten about Cam’ron, he returned in 2002 as part of Jay-Z’s industry-dominating Roc-a-Fella collective. If that wasn’t reason enough to inspire curiosity, Cam’ron’s lead single, “Oh Boy,” blew up urban radio all summer. His rugged rapping and Just Blaze’s soulful production made “Oh Boy” the huge success that it was, yet the joy of hearing Cam’ron on the radio again also had a bit to do with the revival. The Harlem rapper had fallen off the map after S.D.E., his poorly received album from two years earlier. Just two years before that, Cam’ron was one of the industry’s most promising pop-rappers. His first album, Confessions of Fire, produced several singles, including his collaboration with Mase, “Horse & Carriage.” However, 1998 felt like the distant past in 2002, and Cam’ron needed a big comeback after falling into obscurity during the interim. Come Home With Me is indeed that big comeback. Even though members of the Roc-a-Fella roster appear on only two songs — “Welcome to New York City,” featuring Jay-Z, and “The Roc (Just Fire),” featuring Memphis Bleek and Beanie Sigel — Cam’ron doesn’t really need the assistance here. He comes hard on most tracks, yet his muscle is complemented well by producer Just Blaze and his trademark sampling style. Just Blaze doesn’t produce every track on this album, but he does provide the key moments: “Oh Boy” and “The Roc (Just Fire).” Overall, Cam’ron couldn’t return with a stronger comeback album than this: he’s affiliated with one of the industry’s most successful labels, graced with a hot producer, and armed with a dynamite lead single. – Jason Birchmeier

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