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Tea for the Tillerman

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (166 ratings)
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Tea for the Tillerman album cover
Disc 1 of 2
01
Where Do The Children Play?
3:52
$0.79
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02
Hard Headed Woman
3:47
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03
Wild World
3:20
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$1.29
04
Sad Lisa
3:46
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05
Miles From Nowhere
3:37
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06
But I Might Die Tonight
1:54
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07
Longer Boats
3:13
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08
Into White
3:25
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09
On The Road To Find Out
5:08
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10
Father And Son
3:41
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11
Tea For The Tillerman
1:02
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Disc 2 of 2
01
Wild World
3:15
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02
Longer Boats
2:52
$0.49
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03
Into White
3:37
$0.49
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04
Miles From Nowhere
3:15
$0.79
$1.29
05
Hard Headed Woman
3:58
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$1.29
06
Where Do The Children Play?
3:21
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$1.29
07
Sad Lisa
3:13
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08
On The Road To Find Out
4:57
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09
Father & Son
Artist: Yusuf (The Artist Known As Cat Stevens)
4:25
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10
Wild World
Artist: Yusuf (The Artist Known As Cat Stevens)
3:03
$0.49
$0.99
11
Tea For The Tillerman - Live At The BBC
0:52
$0.79
$1.29
Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 22   Total Length: 73:33

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Wondering Sound

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Andy Beta

Contributor

Andy Beta has written about music and comedy for the Wall Street Journal, the disco revival for the Village Voice, animatronic bands for SPIN, Thai pop for the

11.16.10
Innocence hardened into wisdom, love turning to heartbreak
2008 | Label: A&M

In March of 1968, Steven Demetre Georgiou — who gigged around London coffeehouses as Cat Stevens and had released a few pop albums — contracted tuberculosis and nearly died. A long convalescence followed, during which time Stevens's brush with mortality led him to investigate vegetarianism, yoga and world religions (come 1977, he would become a devout Muslim and change his name to Yusuf Islam the next year). When he emerged in the new decade, with… read more »

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Excellent album.

kellyfuturehead3

To write off Cat Stevens because of his taken out of context Pro-Islamic statements like Jazzmine does in their "review" is sad. Tea for the Tillerman is an excellent album. Disc two is mostly out takes and/or demos which I am not a huge fan of but good quality none the less.

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Where do Yusef's Children Play?

ambientscott

Yusuf's Islam's message to kiddies. In 1989, Yusuf Islam was asked by the Christian Science Monitor how he would "cope with the idea of killing a writer for writing a book." The peace man replied: QUOTE "Salman Rushdie or indeed any writer who abuses the prophet, or indeed any prophet, under Islamic law, the sentence for that is actually death. It's got to be seen as a deterrent, so that other people should not commit the same mistake again."

user avatar

A wonderful album

jgavinfl

These songs express the emotions we all feel at the special times of our lives. You can listen to them all day long and never get bored.

user avatar

Disc One -- a must-download

BrianJF

While it may not be as brilliant as "Teaser and the Firecat," this one's still incredible. (Disc 2 is basically unnecessary unless you're a completist, by the way.)

user avatar

Second disc maybe demos?

HawkeyeDave

There is no background musicians or instumentation that I could pick up. But sounds clean and as if were recorded in the same time period. The original album (Disc one)is just as beautiful as it was when released. "Father And Son" is one the most beautiful songs I've ever heard. The verses alternate from father to son, and really bring the generation gap into focus.One of the finest albums of Cat Stevens' career,and one of the finest albums of the 1970s'.

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eMusic Features

0

Six Degrees of Cat Stevens’ Tea for the Tillerman

By Andy Beta, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Mona Bone Jakon only began Cat Stevens’ comeback. Seven months later, he returned with Tea for the Tillerman, an album in the same chamber-group style, employing the same musicians and producer, but with a far more confident tone. Mona Bone Jakon had been full of references to death, but Tea for the Tillerman was not about dying; it was about living in the modern world while rejecting it in favor of spiritual fulfillment. It began with a statement of purpose, “Where Do the Children Play?,” in which Stevens questioned the value of technology and progress. “Wild World” found the singer being dumped by a girl, but making the novel suggestion that she should stay with him because she was incapable of handling things without him. “Sad Lisa” might have been about the same girl after she tried and failed to make her way; now, she seemed depressed to the point of psychosis. The rest of the album veered between two themes: the conflict between the young and the old, and religion as an answer to life’s questions. Tea for the Tillerman was the story of a young man’s search for spiritual meaning in a soulless class society he found abhorrent. He hadn’t yet reached his destination, but he was confident he was going in the right direction, traveling at his own, unhurried pace. The album’s rejection of contemporary life and its yearning for something more struck a chord with listeners in an era in which traditional verities had been shaken. It didn’t hurt, of course, that Stevens had lost none of his ability to craft a catchy pop melody; the album may have been full of angst, but it wasn’t hard to sing along to. As a result, Tea for the Tillerman became a big seller and, for the second time in four years, its creator became a pop star. [In 2008, Tea for the Tillerman appeared in a beautifully remastered edition containing a bonus disc with 11 tracks; and a booklet with brief essays by Yusuf Islam (Stevens' current name), producer Paul Samwell-Smith and guitarist Alun Davies, and complete lyrics and photos. The bonus material was written and recorded for the album. The disc opens with the original demo for "Wild World" with Stevens accompanying himself on acoustic guitar, perhaps the first recorded version of the track. This is followed by two selections -- "Longer Boats" and "Into White" -- taken from a solo concert at the Troubadour in Los Angeles. There's also a great 1969 piano demo of "Miles from Nowhere" that approaches the final album arrangement. The first time Stevens' wonderful studio/backing band appears is on "Hard Headed Woman," from a 1976 tour of Japan. The great Alun Davies, Stevens' right-hand mate on acoustic guitar is here, showing his dusky brilliance. The recording is solid but it's not perfect;, but it contains the drama and intimacy Stevens was capable of injecting his songs with in a live setting. Davies and Stevens' rapport on a stage is even more remarkable than it is in the studio, as a pair of performances from the Majikat Earth Tour in 1976 reveal. "Where Do the Children Play" is one of disc two's real highlights. The real rarities come near the end of the disc, though, with Stevens performing at Yusuf's Café in 2006 accompanied by Davies and a small band. Both songs "Father and Son" and "Wild World" have aged exceedingly well. Making this well worth the money for the update.] – William Ruhlmann & Thom Jurek

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