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Right Now: Live At The Jazz Workshop

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (22 ratings)

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Right Now: Live At The Jazz Workshop album cover
01
New Fables
23:17  
02
Meditation (For A Pair Of Wire Cutters)
23:42  
Album Information
LIVE

Total Tracks: 2   Total Length: 46:59

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Mingus' best

newmusicbass

For me this is not only Mingus but Dannie Richmond's best. The whole band is on fire.

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Whaddoyamean, passionate level, Scott?

Protobopper

I have this record longer than I care to remember and I think it's the ultimate gasser! Scott Yanow says it's not up to the passionate level of the Mingus Sextet with Dolphy and Cliff Jordan, but I fully disagree.Never heard Jordan play more furiously than he does here and although Handy and Jane Getz (B-flat, Jesus!)are no match for the sextet's Dolphy and Byard, this set keeps the listener on his toes without a moment of let-up. That's a full five stars for me.

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Live jazz at full speed

Petrefax

Charles Mingus had in his long career many highlights and these two tracks are showing a band playing at their best. The interaction between the players on these two long jams are very special.

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They Say All Music Guide

Soon after Charles Mingus finished touring Europe with his band (the unit that featured Eric Dolphy), he recorded this CD, performed live at The Jazz Workshop in San Francisco. With tenor-saxophonist Clifford Jordan and drummer Dannie Richmond still in the group but Jane Getz replacing pianist Jaki Byard and altoist John Handy filling in for Dolphy on one song, the band performs excellent versions of “Meditations on Integration” and “New Fables,” both of which are over 23 minutes long. Although not up to the passionate level of the Mingus-Dolphy Quintet, this underrated unit holds its own. – Scott Yanow