|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

Social Call

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (20 ratings)
Retail
Member
Social Call album cover
01
Little Chico
6:23
$0.49
$0.99
02
Social Call
5:48
$0.49
$0.99
03
Half Nelson
6:31
$0.49
$0.99
04
Greenhouse
4:46
$0.49
$0.99
05
Darn That Dream
9:35
$0.49
$0.99
06
Casbah
6:16
$0.49
$0.99
07
Social Call
6:32
$0.49
$0.99
08
Darn That Dream
7:12
$0.49
$0.99
09
Half Nelson
6:01
$0.49
$0.99
Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 9   Total Length: 59:04

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Wondering Sound

Review 0

Britt Robson

Contributor

Britt Robson has written about jazz for Jazz Times, downbeat, the Washington Post and many other publications over the past 30 years. He currently writes regula...more »

04.22.11
Charlie Rouse, Social Call
2007 | Label: Uptown Jazz / The Orchard

Tenor saxophonist Charlie Rouse and trumpeter Red Rodney were around for the infancy of bebop in the 1940s and four decades later (this recording is from 1984) have refined their artistry while retaining the vigilance so crucial to the genre's ensemble synergy. Social Call brims with split-second timing on baton-passed solos, and natty harmonizing on Don Sickler's tricky unison head arrangements. Throw in an ace, active, agile rhythm section and you've got synergistic… read more »

Write a Review 1 Member Review

Please register before you review a release. Register

user avatar

Just Sublime

djdaf

This is a beautiful album. Rouse and Rodney had both been around for a long time, but they were playing real well throughout this session. The head is a little ragged on "Chico", but the mid-tempo numbers shine. "Social Call" and "Casbah" especially. Enjoy!

They Say All Music Guide

Tenor saxophonist Charlie Rouse, 59 at the time, is in top form for this bop-oriented set. Teamed up with trumpeter Red Rodney, pianist Albert Dailey, bassist Cecil McBee and drummer Kenny Washington, Rouse performs Don Sickler arrangements of four jazz standards (including “Half Nelson” and Tadd Dameron’s “Casbah”), plus an obscurity (“Greenhouse”) and his own “Little Chico.” Old friends Rouse and Rodney work off each other very well, and the results are swinging and enjoyable. – Scott Yanow