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The Trailer Tapes

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The Trailer Tapes album cover
01
Back Water Blues
3:06
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02
Something Changed
3:39
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03
Rita's Only Fault
4:06
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04
Spike Drivin' Blues
3:23
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05
Move On
3:25
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06
Hard Edges
2:58
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07
Here Comes the Rain
4:08
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08
Leaving Souvenirs
3:51
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09
House and 90 Acres
3:28
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10
If I Were You
3:00
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11
My Only Prayer
4:34
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 39:38

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I can't get this out of my head...

thisisamazing

Raw? Yeah. Rough around the edges? Oh yeah. But this as real an album as you'll find commercially. I can't get "House and 90 Acres" out of my head: it was a gutpunch first time I heard it. This is a raw, real album, and I'm glad I bought it...

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A Powerful Song Writer

DrR

It may be a matter of personal taste but for me there is something pure about a man with a guitar singing his heart out. This is unvarnished story telling by a masterful song writer with very little production. He gives you a strong sense of a place and a people. Of desperation, joy, and sorrow. A friend asked me what truly great albums had been produced in the last couple of decades- This one was at the top of my list. Get it!

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Best of '07: Chris Knight

MaryAlice

Chris Knight is the most underrated songwriter in North America. Knight recorded these tracks by himself in his singlewide trailer near Slaughter, Kentucky, back in 1996. Bootlegs and outtakes of these tracks have been floating around ever since. They are stripped down, emotional, and very raw. Knight is a master of storytelling – recalling lost love and broken hearts, hating the dead-end job, the bank foreclosing on the farm, and disillusion with city life. Knight has been picked up and dropped by the major labels all through his career. I had the privilege to see him perform and to meet him in 2007, and he was very humble and soft spoken. I'll take raw emotion and brilliant songwriting in a Kentucky trailer over Nashville radio bombastic hair gel, fake smile pop-crap like Rascal Flatts any day.

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Redneck feminist?

BobTheBoar

Great voice. Great story teller. Rita's Only Fault is a standout. Does his fierce and heartfelt support of the abused Rita make Chris Knight some kind of oddity, the Redneck Feminist, or more likely does it actually make him the voice of the silent majority?

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Chris Knight & his music

FlipFlopNation

Damngood, damngood, damngood. Please continue with what you do.

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The Trailer Tapes

Nikonmike

Come on Chris, you have the voice, musical skills and killer lyrics that make us see things in a different light. We don't want to hear middle of the road songs about oatmeal and washing clothes. Dig deeper, you have what it takes to be on top. Add a banjo and a bottle of Van Winkles and write the perfect beast. Your mind and voice are the instruments. You can do it. Next album due Sept 11-rock this planet!

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Chris Knight

redfury

The best songwriter of this generation.

They Say All Music Guide

A couple years before releasing his 1998 Decca debut, Chris Knight demoed some of his songs with that disc’s eventual co-producer, Frank Liddell. These were the days before computer software made it easy for home recording, so Liddell wound up recording Knight in an old trailer on Knight’s Kentucky farm. Ten years down the road, these tapes got cleaned up by ace engineer/producer Ray Kennedy, and the results are quite wonderful. Only three of these 11 tunes (“Something Changed,” “House and 90 Acres,” and “If I Were You”) later appeared on official Knight releases, but there isn’t a drop-off in quality with the previously unreleased songs. The Trailer Tapes reveals Knight already to be a mature, gifted songwriter. The territory that he has addressed throughout his career — hard-living working men, heartbreak, and stifling small-town existence — is all here in impressive form. The disc is packed with powerful portraits of rural working life. On tracks like “Backwater Blues” and “Here Comes the Rain,” he eloquently uses nature metaphors (the river in the former and farming and rain in the latter) to discuss heartache. With “Hard Edges” and “Move On,” he offers vividly detailed studies of small-town life. The John Prine-ish “Hard Edges” poignantly profiles a woman who went from a grade-school ballerina to a blue-collar bar stripper, while “Move On” tackles the city-versus-country class struggle in the menacing tale of a bar fight. This tune, one of several mentioning pistols, contains a fine example of Knight’s “redneck” but sharp-edged writing in the couplet “You say you’re from college/But you don’t seem too bright/You just brung a switchblade/To a pistol fight.” Knight also tackles country versus city life in the memorable closing number, “My Only Prayer,” where the Kentucky-based Knight finds nothing to love in the big city. This moving lament also spotlights the disc’s spare, almost rudimentary sound. Some reviews of his debut album noted that the standard country-rock arrangements distracted from Knight’s songs. Here, however, it is just Knight singing to his acoustic guitar, allowing the listener’s focus to fall on his ample songwriting talents. While his character-rich tunes and husky country twang reveal the influence of Prine and, more prominently, Steve Earle, Knight demonstrates that he is a natural storyteller and chronicler of the rural life. Although these tracks started out as demos, they are worthy additions to Knight’s body of work. – Michael Berick

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