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Chris McGregor's Brotherhood Of Breath

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Chris McGregor's Brotherhood Of Breath album cover
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MRA
5:05
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02
Davashe's Dream
7:33
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03
The Bride
7:43
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Andromeda
4:09
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Night Poem
20:43  
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Union Special
1:44
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 6   Total Length: 46:57

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One of the greatest records ever

Katzmammal

I first heard this disc in the early 70s, shortly after it was released. A friend and i literally wore out the groves. It was his disc and when I moved to NYC in 1974, I didn't buy a copy. Somehow I found a vinyl version in the last 10 years and listening to it reaffirmed my opinion from 30 years ago. I am gratified to find a digital version on eMusic. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.

eMusic Features

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Chris McGregor: Cape Town to Free Town

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

It wasn't easy, being the interracial Blue Notes in 1963 apartheid South Africa: a black horns-and-rhythm combo with a white pianist/music director, Chris McGregor. They skipped out of Cape Town the following year: went to a French festival and didn't return. In London by '65, the quintet's members were welcomed by forward-looking jazz musicians: Steve Lacy drafted bassist Johnny Dyani and drummer Louis Moholo for the album The Forest and the Zoo, and an ill-fated… more »

They Say All Music Guide

An album that fuses the influence of African music, jazz-rock, and free improvisation, Chris McGregor’s Brotherhood of Breath shares affinities with the ’70s music of Don Cherry and Miles Davis. Somewhat of a legendary album amongst collectors of British jazz and fusion, the LP was originally released in the ’70s and in early 2002 finally became reissued by the Italian label Akarma. Enlisted on the session were the talents of a group of extraordinary musicians from the free jazz, progressive rock, and improvisation scenes. Chris McGregor led the group on piano and African xylophone with Malcolm Griffiths and Nick Evans on trombones, Mongezi Feza on pocket trumpet and Indian flute, Mark Charig on cornet, Harry Beckett on trumpet, and Dudu Pukwana on alto saxophone. Ronnie Beer’s tenor saxophone is outstanding, and pitched up against Alan Skidmore’s tenor and soprano saxophone, completing a massive horn section, are two bigger names: ’70s U.K. jazzman Mike Osborne on alto saxophone and clarinet and John Surman on baritone and soprano saxophone. Brotherhood of Breath created one of the defining recordings of ethno-jazz with this album; with an expansive use of African-inspired melodies, they trace textures which culminate in an ecstatic peak on “Night Poem,” the album’s 20-minute standout track. Not to forget, the album is driven by the organic pulse of the rhythm section — bassist Harry Miller and drummer Louis Moholo, no less — who will be names familiar to fans of British free jazz. This album comes highly recommended to fans of Don Cherry, Afro-beat sounds, and the Sun Ra Arkestra. – Dean McFarlane

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