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The Blues Ain't Nothin' (Blues Reference Recorded in France 1971-1973)

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The Blues Ain't Nothin' (Blues Reference Recorded in France 1971-1973) album cover
01
Sad Sad Hour
3:51
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02
You Got Money
5:46
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03
My Time Is Expensive
4:31
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04
Slow Down
4:55
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05
Taking My Chance
6:18
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06
Just Got Lucky
3:53
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07
Deep Deep Water
10:07  
08
Goin' to Chicago
4:17
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09
Dirty Work At Crossroads
4:47
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10
Here I Am
3:25
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11
New Okie Dokie Stomp
2:37
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12
Piney Brown Blues
5:04
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13
Hot Club Drive
7:13
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14
The People
4:37
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 14   Total Length: 71:21

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Gate

naldini

The man has dozens of albums and for years has made constantly different music on each. I've seen Gate go from hard core country to western swing to modern jazz with the 'greatest of ease'. He admired only one other musician, Duke Ellington and as a musical genius Gate does him proud.

user avatar

Blues god ?

Kazoo

I guess you only get this good by doing it for a lifetime. Composer, arranger, band leader, performer. Genius.

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