|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

Four-Calendar Café

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (141 ratings)
Retail
Member
Four-Calendar Café album cover
01
Know Who You Are At Every Age
3:40
$0.49
$0.99
02
Evangeline
4:31
$0.49
$0.99
03
Bluebeard
3:56
$0.49
$0.99
04
Theft, And Wandering Around Lost
4:31
$0.49
$0.99
05
Oil Of Angels
4:39
$0.49
$0.99
06
Squeeze-Wax
3:49
$0.49
$0.99
07
My Truth
4:34
$0.49
$0.99
08
Essence
3:03
$0.49
$0.99
09
Summerhead
3:39
$0.49
$0.99
10
Pur
5:01
$0.49
$0.99
Album Information

Total Tracks: 10   Total Length: 41:23

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Write a Review 9 Member Reviews

Please register before you review a release. Register

user avatar

Still gorgeous. So don't hesitate!

Britster

While this may be regarded by the chattering classes as a lesser Cocteau collection, as one of just a couple of albums available on emusic, it really is a must have, and on its own terms still a fabulous, late-period testament to the sheer beauty and uniqueness of their sound. Its only lesser, because other albums were THAT INCREDIBLE.

user avatar

Great in the Middle too!

FiddlinGreg

This group seems to be without ego. I can't think of one album that any liner notes indicated who they were or showed a picture. Their music reflects that too, as they clearly are following their muse. I started hearing CTs in the early 80's. Because most of Fraser's vocals were overdubbed, (and of course no liner notes) the name implied to me two women, and so they became when I listened. At first I thought 'they' were singing in French ... but soon came to realize that it was tone poem. The lyrics became your own thoughts and so changed each time it was heard. The group grew and changed over the years ... all the way to Milk and Kisses, and I can't think of one album that I don't enjoy immensely. I love the earlier edge and the later softness, and all of it in between. They are still singing twins to me ... and Elizabeth Fraser's voice is sheer beauty. Soft, hard, beckoning, erotic. There is no good or bad, best or lest ... just music to get lost in or make love to.

user avatar

Inteligible lyrics?

senatorbobdole

Cocteau Twins fans generally poo-poo this album because one can actually decode Frasier's lyrics. But it's their most straight forward, accessible record, and it ends up being really beautiful. I own many of their cds, and this is the one i come back to. I wish she'd hurry up and make music already....

user avatar

Bluebird Sings

DasFox

Bluebird sings to me, and this song has a driving force behind it like no other I have felt by them. Bluebird truly is a song that sings out and takes you for a ride... Granted this song doesn't quite have the strong early etheral edge, but it floats and sways you... Even for those that can't understand the lyrics, how can you not be swayed by the sounds... Picture yourself on that motorcyle, or convertable automobile cruising down the road with the air blowing through our hair, and you'll see what I feel, ALIVE! Aliveness!!!!!

user avatar

Great album.

stabdaddy

Different. Beautiful. Classic. 'Summerhead', 'Know Who You Are At Every Age' and 'My Truth' are my favorites from this release.

user avatar

Far better than advertised

Remmev

I think this collection is full of beautiful songs. I've always been baffled why so many seem to really dislike it. True, it's pretty smoothed out, and not remotely edgy, but if I need that I'll listen to another recording.

user avatar

Better With Time

Relayer71

Not as immediately beautiful as Heaven Or Las Vegas or as unconventional as Head Over Heels or as pretty as Treasure - this album is one I disliked for years before truly appreciating it. It starts off with a decent but understated track and then goes off into one of the most dull and unnecessary Twins tracks, Evangeline. The next track is marred by a very straightforward chorus which lacks the usual mystery and tension of a CT song. This is resolved by the end of the next track though. From there on the album is full of a lovely mellowness with airy tracks like "Oil Of Angels" and "My Truth" and in the touching and moving "Pur". "Summerhead" is also a standout which wouldn't seem out of place in Blue Bell Knoll. I wouldn't rate this their most consistent and it lacks some of the originality of their previous albums, but this is probably Cocteau Twins most mature and underrated album.

user avatar

I like it

leemail98

If this was the first Cocteau Twins album I'd ever heard (actually that was blue bell knoll), and I had no idea what the Cocteau's were "supposed" to sound like... then I would have to admit that this isn't half bad. I would more likely put this on if I'm in the mood for The Sundays or Lush before I would place it next to earlier Cocteau. The first half of this disc is a guilty pleasure of mine.

user avatar

a travesty

snej

Horrifically watered-down, it sounds as though they're not even trying anymore musically; although Liz unfortunately _is_ trying to make her words understandable, and they are revealed as trite beyond belief. I was horrified by this CD when it came out. The strange thing is that the Cocteaux had already shown, with "Heaven Or Las Vegas", that they could make their sound more 'accessible' without losing the basics of what made it great. I'd recommend that, or any of their earlier albums, over this pale imitation.

eMusic Features

0

Who Are…Mt. Wolf

By Marissa G. Muller, Contributor

When Kate Sproule started Mt. Wolf in 2011 with her childhood friend Stevie McMinn and his college mates, she'd hardly sung a note. Still, she was so committed to pursuing music that she turned down her first post-college job offer to stick with the band. It's a risk that seems to have paid off: Mt. Wolf's delicate indie rock stands out among London's current sound sculptors, savvily blending bass music, folktronic and indie R&B. Only… more »

0

Who Are…Tamaryn

By Marissa G. Muller, Contributor

The contrast between the cover art for Tamaryn's Tender New Signs and their 2010 debut The Waves is telling: A lush array of fuschia petals signifying new life, growth and resilience have replaced the barren, vast red-rock landscape, and singer Tamaryn's distant figure is gone altogether. That may be because Tamaryn retreated from public life while writing the follow-up, so much so that she and guitarist Rex John Shelverton worked mostly long-distance, exchanging ideas and… more »

0

Who Are…TEEN

By J. Edward Keyes, Editor-in-Chief

"I'll do it better, I'll do it better, I'll do it better than anybody else," sings Teeny Lieberson just 90 seconds into In Limbo, the first proper full-length from TEEN. As it turns out, that line is a feint; the group may open In Limbo with forthrightness, but the rest of In Limbo is full of bewitching misdirection. Just one song later, Teeny is singing "Come back, I don't wanna sleep another night alone" while… more »

0

Who Are…Ice Choir

By Annie Zaleski, Contributor

Kurt Feldman is one of the busiest musicians in New York. Although his chiptune-flecked dreampop project the Depreciation Guild broke up in 2010, he currently drums for the Pains of Being Pure at Heart and produces bands in his apartment-based studio. Feldman is also a rabid fan of obscure new-wave (favorites include Danish electropop act Gangway and noted cult figure Bill Nelson), Japanese synthpop and shoegaze bands — all of which inspire and inform his new… more »

0

From a Whisper to a Scream

By Douglas Wolk, Contributor

Börk's got a lot going for her: eccentric songwriting, visual presence, a smartly chosen bunch of collaborators, high-flying conceptual grandeur. More than anything, though, she's got a voice like nothing else on the planet. It's bizarre and lovely, a sound that seems at home both on radio hits and in avant-garde art spaces. It communicates at least as much as her songs themselves, and in fact presenting lyrics is pretty far from the point: unless… more »

0

Behold the Shoes: A Brief History of Shoegaze

By Douglas Wolk, Contributor

No, it's not a great name: "shoegazing." Very few artists who've actually played in that style like the term; Stuart Braithwaite of Mogwai has called it "a dumb term made up by clueless... idiots... if someone called us shoegazers, I'd be pretty unhappy." The other leading candidate seems to be "dreampop," which is also not quite satisfactory. But we're stuck with those words, because it's undeniable that there's a certain tendency in rock music, especially British… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Cocteau Twins’ first release following their exodus from the 4AD stable, Four-Calendar Cafe is also, tellingly, their most earthbound effort; as with Heaven or Las Vegas, the emphasis here is on substance as much as style — “Evangeline,” “Bluebeard,” and “Know Who You Are at Every Age” continue the trio’s advance into more accessible melodic and lyrical ground without sacrificing even an ounce of their trademark ethereality. – Jason Ankeny