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Cosmo's Factory (40th Anniversary Edition)

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Cosmo's Factory (40th Anniversary Edition) album cover
01
Ramble Tamble
7:11  
02
Before You Accuse Me
3:26  
03
Travelin Band
2:07  
04
Ooby Dooby
2:07  
05
Lookin' Out My Back Door
2:32  
06
Run Through The Jungle
3:04  
07
Up Around The Bend
2:41  
08
My Baby Left Me
2:18  
09
Who'll Stop The Rain
2:27  
10
I Heard It Through The Grapevine
11:02  
11
Long As I Can See The Light
3:30  
12
Travelin' Band [Remake Take]
2:15  
13
Up Around The Bend [Live in Amsterdam]
2:41  
14
Born On The Bayou [Jam with Booker T.]
5:58  
Album Information

Total Tracks: 14   Total Length: 53:19

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Defines classic rock

Caithiseach

CCR didn't stray far from their hitmaking formula, but some of their most inspired work appears on this album. The Vietnam references are unfortunately pertinent again, and the compact rock style doesn't wear out after 40 years. The bonus material is interesting, but I wouldn't call it essential.

user avatar

Great to exercise to

bobby46

Just as enjoyable when it first cam out over 40 years ago

user avatar

Cosmo

EMUSIC-00D95208

My first album. I bought it way back in 1973 when I was 10 years old. And this is still my favourite, call me stupid or whatever. Ramble Tamble makes my hair stand on end and "grapevine" is awesome.

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Horrible Mix

OldRattler

Heard it live back when and can't believe it sounded this bad!

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They Say All Music Guide

Throughout 1969 and into 1970, CCR toured incessantly and recorded nearly as much. Appropriately, Cosmo’s Factory’s first single was the working band’s anthem “Travelin’ Band,” a funny, piledriving rocker with a blaring horn section — the first indication their sonic palette was broadening. Two more singles appeared prior to the album’s release, backed by John Fogerty originals that rivaled the A-side or paled just slightly. When it came time to assemble a full album, Fogerty had only one original left, the claustrophobic, paranoid rocker “Ramble Tamble.” Unlike some extended instrumentals, this was dramatic and had a direction — a distinction made clear by the meandering jam that brings CCR’s version of “I Heard It Through the Grapevine” to 11 minutes. Even if it wanders, their take on the Marvin Gaye classic isn’t unpleasant, and their faithful, exuberant takes on the Sun classics “Ooby Dooby” and “My Baby Left Me” are joyous tributes. Still, the heart of the album lays in those six fantastic songs released on singles. “Up Around the Bend” is a searing rocker, one of their best, balanced by the menacing murkiness of “Run Through the Jungle.” “Who’ll Stop the Rain”‘s poignant melody and melancholy undertow has a counterpart in Fogerty’s dope song, “Lookin’ out My Back Door,” a charming, bright shuffle, filled with dancing animals and domestic bliss – he had never been as sweet and silly as he is here. On “Long as I Can See the Light,” the record’s final song, he again finds solace in home, anchored by a soulful, laid-back groove. It hits a comforting, elegiac note, the perfect way to draw Cosmo’s Factory — an album made during stress and chaos, filled with raging rockers, covers, and intense jams — to a close. – Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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