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Pendulum

Rate It! Avg: 3.5 (56 ratings)
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Pendulum album cover
01
Pagan Baby
6:24
$0.79
$1.29
02
Sailor's Lament
3:46
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$1.29
03
Chameleon
3:17
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$1.29
04
Have You Ever Seen The Rain?
2:40
$0.79
$1.29
05
(Wish I Could) Hideaway
3:43
$0.79
$1.29
06
Born To Move
5:41
$0.79
$1.29
07
Hey Tonight
2:43
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$1.29
08
It's Just A Thought
3:51
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$1.29
09
Molina
2:43
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$1.29
10
Rude Awakening #2
6:22
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11
45 Revolutions Per Minute
3:18
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12
45 Revolutions Per Minute
7:20
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$1.29
13
Hey Tonight
2:30
$0.79
$1.29
Album Information

Total Tracks: 13   Total Length: 54:18

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6 x 4

beaglesayarf

Just before Tom Fogerty left to find his solo voice, CCR released Pendulum. You could hear the evolution that was taking place. The album kicks off with Pagan Baby, a take no prisoners throw down! Which leads us into the sing along Sailor's Lament. Chamelon comes back to bite us, then the single, with pop sensibilities still in tact. The bluesy Hideaway closes out side one on the original vinyl version. Born to Move is a throw back to that Lee Dorsey sound updated, with a revival of sorts in Hey Tonight! It's just a thought is a thoughtful kick back tune, a pause that refreshes just before they pay tribute to Chuck Berry's Maybelline with Molina, finishing up with the hypnotic Rude Awakening #2, a tune too good to leave out. While it might have been fun, I can personally do without the 45 Revolutions per minute. But the live kicker of Hey Tonight is a gem. Other bonus material features Booker T helping out on live material.

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The Remasters

tx1950

All of the remastered CDs sounded great. I would recommend purchasing all of these CD's. Fantasy did a great job. If you are looking for the definitive CD's from CCR. buy these. You won't be sorry,

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Up There with Cosmo's

EeewMusic

This ranks with Cosmo's as one of the best CCR ablums, if not the best. Strong hooks, good songs, warm production, a sizzling vibe. Worth every second.

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They Say All Music Guide

During 1969 and 1970, CCR were dismissed by hipsters as a bubblegum pop band and the sniping had grown intolerable, at least to John Fogerty, who designed Pendulum as a rebuke to critics. He spent time polishing the production, bringing in keyboards, horns, even a vocal choir. His songs became self-consciously serious and tighter, working with the aesthetic of the rock underground — Pendulum was constructed as a proper album, contrasting dramatically with CCR’s previous records, all throwbacks to joyous early rock records where covers sat nicely next to hits and overlooked gems tucked away at the end of the second side. To some fans of classic CCR, this approach may feel a little odd since only “Have You Ever Seen the Rain” and maybe its B-side, “Hey Tonight,” sound undeniably like prime Creedence. But, given time, the album is a real grower, revealing many overlooked Fogerty gems. Yes, it isn’t transcendent like the albums they made from Bayou Country through Cosmo’s Factory, but most bands never even come close to that kind of hot streak. Instead, Pendulum finds a first-class songwriter and craftsman pushing himself and his band to try new sounds, styles, and textures. His ambition results in a stumble — “Rude Awakening #2″ portentously teeters on the verge of prog rock, something CCR just can’t pull off — but the rest of the record is excellent, with such great numbers as the bluesy groove “Pagan Baby,” the soulful vamp “Chameleon,” the moody “It’s Just a Thought,” and the raver “Molina.” Most bands would kill for this to be their best stuff, and the fact that it’s tucked away on an album that even some fans forget illustrates how tremendous Creedence Clearwater Revival really were. [The 40th anniversary edition of Pendulum included remastering as well as three bonus tracks: both parts of the single "45 Revolutions Per Minute" and a live version of "Hey Tonight" recorded in 1971.] – Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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