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Willy and the Poor Boys

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (503 ratings)

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Willy and the Poor Boys album cover
01
Down On The Corner
2:48  
02
It Came Out Of The Sky
2:57  
03
Cotton Fields
2:57  
04
Poorboy Shuffle
2:25  
05
Feelin' Blue
5:06  
06
Fortunate Son
2:21  
07
Don't Look Now
2:11  
08
The Midnight Special
4:14  
09
Side O' The Road
3:24  
10
Effigy
6:33  
Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 10   Total Length: 34:56

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Write a Review 14 Member Reviews

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A great "little" album

cyberghost

A pleasing mix of originals and old american rock and blues, the style being raw and basic. Not overly raucous singing,and Fortunate Son the clear protest song ,having once owned the 45. Caught it again on Die Hard 4. I enjoyed the album and the memories I missed by buying said album .

user avatar

CCR at its best!

theisey

Takes me back to my youth. Great songs by a great band and I end up singing along when no one's around.

user avatar

Fantastic

profswen

Probably my favorite album by one of my favorite bands of all-time. Rock, country, folk, and blues all wrapped up into one.

user avatar

Excellent Creedence

EEMUSIC-008C9B1B

Loved this album since the 70's. Great place to start if this is your first introduction. My favorite still after all of these years is Effigy.

user avatar

The Soutern Boys Sing Out

RickyRicardo

Once upon a time those southern boys could find the pulse of a generation. That generation fought the vietnam war and founded a protest movement. The Woodstock generation discovered something back in 1969; and CCR was able to put the vibe down on vinyl. The mood was captured in Fortunate Son -- a song about the injustice of the vietnam draft. A Fortunate Son was able to influence the selective service. The song captures a class struggle.

user avatar

Pretty Good

flobro

Pretty Good

user avatar

Awesome

pcaps

It's so easy to take CCR for granted, or even worst to think of them as a hits band. Their albums almost always work better as wholes and this one really opens up with multiple listens.

user avatar

My least fav album when the band was together

gheeblefarms

is still better than anything put out by any band this decade. It's still 5+ stars! My problem is a dislike for "Down on the Corner." But, the truth is, the rest of this album is pure gold.

user avatar

Oh the memories...

nanaimo12

I listened extensively to CCR as a child, particularly this album. Although I very much enjoy songs like Poor Boy and Cotton Fields, my favourite here is Midnight Special (which, btw, was first recorded commercially by Sam Collins, but popularized by Leadbelly). What a great song, and what a great rendition of it!

user avatar

Excellent

HowGozit

Just as I remember from the days when many of these were hits on the radio. Well worth the download.

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They Say All Music Guide

Make no mistake, Willy & the Poor Boys is a fun record, perhaps the breeziest album CCR ever made. Apart from the eerie minor-key closer “Effigy” (one of John Fogerty’s most haunting numbers), there is little of the doom that colored Green River. Fogerty’s rage remains, blazing to the forefront on “Fortunate Son,” a working-class protest song that cuts harder than any of the explicit Vietnam protest songs of the era, which is one of the reasons that it hasn’t aged where its peers have. Also, there’s that unbridled vocal from Fogerty and the ferocious playing on CCR, which both sound fresh as they did upon release. “Fortunate Son” is one of the greatest, hardest rock & rollers ever cut, so it might seem to be out of step with an album that is pretty laid-back and friendly, but there’s that elemental joy that by late ’69 was one of CCR’s main trademarks. That joy runs throughout the album, from the gleeful single “Down on the Corner” and the lazy jugband blues of “Poorboy Shuffle” through the great slow blues jam “Feelin’ Blue” to the great rockabilly spiritual “Don’t Look Now,” one of Fogerty’s overlooked gems. The covers don’t feel like throwaways, either, since both “Cotton Fields” and “The Midnight Special” have been overhauled to feel like genuine CCR songs. It all adds up to one of the greatest pure rock & roll records ever cut. – Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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