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Time On Earth

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (262 ratings)
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Time On Earth album cover
01
Nobody Wants To
4:10
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02
Don't Stop Now
3:54
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03
She Called Up
2:53
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04
Say That Again
5:21
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05
Pour Le Monde
5:10
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06
Even A Child
3:57
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07
Heaven That I'm Making
3:56
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08
A Sigh
3:17
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09
Silent House
5:52
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10
English Trees
3:43
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11
Walked Her Way Down
4:17
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12
Transit Lounge
4:25
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13
You Are The One To Make Me Cry
3:43
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14
People Are Like Suns
3:52
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 14   Total Length: 58:30

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Another Crowded House Classic

Guitarzan

Very enjoyable tunes and melodies. Classic Crowded House.

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OMG!!!

amberosia13

i LOVE C.H. and the best song on this album by far is SILENT HOUSE. A must have. So tragic the circumstances of their getting back together. I guess there's no better way for a songwriter to deal with life than to write and sing about it.

user avatar

Melancholy in the "House"

FabCritic

This isn't the album you add to your mp3 player with the intent of working out to. Each song is a specific story; many of them filled with anything from longing and sadness to unease and edge. This is intelligent stuff of depth; music you'll respect enough to sit still and listen to. It is a gift to music lovers that this band is back. - Joher Coleman at http://www.imdb.com/- - name/- - nm0403825/

user avatar

Finn, a master.

justincarlson11

It took me too long to find Neil Finn's songwriting--close to perfect crafting of melody and lyrics. This album is easy to listen to but not without its unique take of pop sensibilities that bring something new to each listen.

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Moving

lunchpail

Great collection of songs inspired by grief.

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One of my favorite finds

daeby

This is one of may favorite eMusic finds. Clearly a bit dark, and the lyrics are full of meaning. It may take more than one listen for many to 'get' some of the tracks. They are all quite good.

user avatar

It's like they never left

jackallday

It's funny how the great ones can leave the scene for a while, (sometimes for an extended period of time like Steely Dan did), return and not miss a beat! The same can be said for Crowded House. Any House fan knows the songs will be perfect pop no matter the decade. We haven't had The Beatles for a long time now, but as long as the brothers Finn can get together to record every now and then..I'll be happy.

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Gorgeous

EMUSIC-007DC800

As a long-time Crowded House fan, I eagerly awaited the band's first album in years and it was worth the wait. As with Woodface and Together Alone, and with much of Neil's solo work over the past decade, this album takes time to grow on you but the joy is in letting the songs unfold and reveal themselves over many listenings. It's hard not to miss the playfulness that Paul Hester brought to the band, but this album fits well into the Crowded House/Neil Finn canon.

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A grower

AubreyMcFate

My first few listens, I didn't get it. Then it clicked. Still a little overproduced in my opinion, but there's some great stuff. "Even a Child" is amazing.

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Wonderful album

sbahns

I admit I had low expectations, but I should have known better. I have loved Crowded House for years and was afraid it would be a disappointment, but I was SO wrong. It is a great album and it is so nice that after all these years we can still expect wonderful work from Mr. Finn & Co. His voice is as beautiful as ever and the music, IMHO, is even more varied and original than before. Very cool.

They Say All Music Guide

Although Neil Finn was always the undisputed leader of Crowded House, they also possessed an undeniable band chemistry, most apparent on their freewheeling live shows but also evident on their four studio albums, each possessing a distinct identity from each other. When Neil pulled the plug on Crowded House after 1994′s Together Alone, it was clear that it was for musical reasons, that he wanted to step out and try some new things, resulting the kaleidoscopic Try Whistling This and the hazy One Nil, both book-ended by albums with his brother Tim. Neil planned to follow that second Finn Brothers album with another solo project, but as he started work, tragedy struck: his longtime friend Paul Hester, the drummer for Split Enz and Crowded House, committed suicide in 2005. In the wake of his death, Finn reconnected with the other founding Crowded House member, bassist Nick Seymour, and slowly the third solo album turned into a Crowded House album, with latter-day second guitarist/multi-instrumentalist Mark Hart brought in along the way, working alongside guests like Johnny Marr and Enz keyboardist Eddie Rayner. It was an organic reunion — and not uncommon in the Enz universe, either, as the band keeps falling together for occasional anniversary concerts and popping up on each other’s albums — that arose perhaps as part of the grieving process, or perhaps Neil realizing he’d rather be part of a band than a solo act and, in his words, “what other band could I be in.”
So, the very fact that Crowded House re-formed made sense, but the resulting 2007 album Time on Earth feels considerably different than the band’s first four, often betraying its origins as a Neil Finn solo album. To begin with, it’s streamlined where their previous albums were ragged, and the most notable element that’s been trimmed is the humor that ran throughout each of their albums. This curtailing of good spirits is an appropriate, even expected, reaction to Hester’s death, and his ghost does linger over the whole of Time on Earth, beginning with its very title and carrying through to Seymour’s artwork, but most apparent in the subdued, contemplative tone of the album. Finn’s lyrics are littered with allusions to Hester — sometimes deceptively so, as on “Silent House,” co-written with the Dixie Chicks prior to the drummer’s death and first appearing on their 2006 album Taking the Long Way — and this mildly mournful vibe is enhanced by the subdued tone of the album. This set of songs takes its time, relying heavily on ballads and meditative, mid-tempo pop tunes, and even the brighter numbers like “She Called Up” are far from sprightly. Finn may in a ruminative mode but Time on Earth is not heavy-handed or oppressively sorrowful: it’s contemplative and sweetly melancholy. Given this hushed vibe, it’s not surprising that the album, as a whole, is a bit of a grower, as Finn’s tunes take some time to reveal their gifts. A few songs have an immediate impact — such as the gently propulsive “Don’t Stop Now,” the snappy, jangly Marr collaboration “Even a Child” (the closest this record comes to a rocker) and the spacy, tongue-in-cheek “Transit Lounge,” featuring Beth Rowley as vocal support — but most of these are subtle songs that unfold at their own speed. It may take some time for the songs to catch hold, but once they do, they dig deep, sticking around in the memory like much of Finn’s best work. But even if the best of this album does stand proudly alongside the best of Finn’s music, Time on Earth is still quite unlike any of his other records: strangely, it feels more like a solo album than either of his solo albums, partially because it’s such an introspective work, partially because it sustains a bittersweet tone from beginning to end, whereas his other solo efforts careened wildly between moods. But even if this is unquestionably Neil Finn’s show, this also does feel like the work of a band, since there is a warmth here, a feeling of support, that sounds like a group, not a one-man-band. This curious intermingling of sounds and intent makes Time on Earth a haunting yet comforting affair that is quite unique in Neil Finn’s body of work, yet functions as an oddly appropriate, utterly worthy, comeback as Crowded House. [The CD was also released with a bonus DVD.] – Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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