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Shiney on the Inside

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Shiney on the Inside album cover
01
Radar
4:22
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02
One Track Mind
5:13
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03
Dangerous Dilettante
3:34
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04
21
4:27
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05
Sex Maniacs
4:24
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06
One Thing After Another
4:55
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07
Space Daddy
3:57
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08
Groover
5:07
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09
Shiney on the Inside
4:18
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10
Here Come The Impostors
4:47
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11
Take A Deep Breath
5:36
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12
your nearest exit..
0:55
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 51:35

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They Say All Music Guide

Released two long years after the magnificent Work, Lovelife, Miscellaneous, and too late, therefore, to appeal to anybody beyond the still devoted handfuls that pursued Devant around the country, Shiney on the Inside nevertheless stands as one of the landmark albums of the later Brit-pop years. And that despite its closest living relative being the self-immolation of Pulp’s This Is Hardcore, and its own portrait of a band on the wrong end of record company politics.
Pulp were lucky. They made it huge before it all went wrong. Devant were derailed before things really got started, journeying from bright hopes to dying embers in the blink of an eye. Shiney on the Inside is the album that mourns the mess they find themselves in.
Opening with “Radar,” a pulsating collision between classic Blur, late-’70s Sparks and vintage Tubeway Army, the album maintains its predecessor’s edgy tightrope walk between blatant fun and dangerous pop. But it’s the fatigue and fear that make up the most defiant frills in the mix, with only Mikey Georgeson’s winning way with lyric and melody standing between his bandmates and oblivion. “One Track Mind,” in particular, is a lost Beatles classic and no mistake, while “Here Come The Imposters” is the sound of a very angry Ultravox, if David Bowie had dressed up as Midge Ure. Elsewhere, the presence of former Specimen/Banshees mainstay Jon Klein sprinkles some characteristically astonishing guitar textures through even the most outwardly harmless song. “Sex Maniacs” drags a little, “Space Daddy” never recovers from its resemblance to a Babylon Zoo outtake), while the hyper-eerie “Take a Deep Breath” closes the album on such a remarkable downer that the album’s one serious flaw — the absence of any truly soul-stirring hits — becomes absolutely irrelevant. – Dave Thompson

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