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Shooting At The Sun With A Water Gun

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (24 ratings)
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Shooting At The Sun With A Water Gun album cover
01
If You Break My Heart
3:17
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02
The Real Tina Turner
3:22
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03
Love
4:21
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04
The Lonesomeness That Kills
3:39
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05
Pied Piper Of The Flying Rats
3:03
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06
Rosary
4:06
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07
The World Is Not My Home
4:23
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08
The Waiter
5:20
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09
Analysis Of A 1970's Divorce
2:40
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10
Proposal
1:43
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11
Now & On
5:51
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 41:45

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Oops, forgot the stars

Potato

damn

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Steady Rockin'

Potato

Another great album! Each one continues the story, each one evolves musically but never departs from the path, the road, the highway. Nostalgic, poetic, inspiring, funny, rockin', cool as hell, doing live shows all the time everywhere, David Dondero is the real deal. check out ghostmeat records for his earlier stuff. www.ghostmeat.com

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You Wish Dondero Was Bright Eyes

Shamtasm

In all actuality, David Dondero has been a practicing musician far longer than Connor Oberst. In fact,in past interviews, Connor Oberst has admitted to being influenced by David Dondero. "David Dondero is the poor man's bright eyes," is one of the most idiotic and ignorant assertions i've ever heard. "Shooting at the Sun With a Water Gun" is a lovely album--all comparisons aside. It accounts tribulations from the road while maintaining interestng and infective hooks that manage to stay in your head for days. Dave's informal approach to music is what makes it so easy to like his music. Enough of the, "He sounds just like Bright Eyes!?" Because it is actually Bright Eyes who sounds like David.

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A Poor Man's Bright Eyes

Centeran

Derivative vocal melodies, passé ironic lyrics, sloppy guitar strumming and really, really exceptionally bad drums- there are other things out there in the singer-songwriter realm that put this to shame. A sad effort.

They Say All Music Guide

Including three records with his band, Sunbrain, Shooting at the Sun With a Water Gun makes the sixth release from David Dondero since 1993, but that prodigious output doesn’t dull the edges of his songwriting in the least. Indeed, the 11 songs here ring abundantly true and seem to emerge from the bottomless wellspring of an odd-job and barroom-chat existence. Dondero had long lived a troubadour lifestyle à la obvious influence Townes Van Zandt prior to recording Shooting, and that reality comes out in the acoustic minimalism of the music (although a few songs, like “If You Break My Heart,” have a fuller and modern-tinged production) as well as in sharply observed, occasionally pointed songs like the quirky, dialogue-driven “The Real Tina Turner” or “Love.” “The Waiter,” in fact, could be a lost Van Zandt outtake, and if it sounds a bit too similar to the foot-stomping, country-blues side of that legendary songwriter’s compositional output, it is still a wonderfully rambling, road-ready tribute. Even better, though, is the autobiographical “Analysis of a 1970s Divorce,” which references Van Zandt without aping his style, and turns what could have been a painful personal outcry into a wonderfully warm-hearted account of a tricky subject. Much of the album, though, is cast in a much bleaker musical light, with a production that completely suits the tone: withered but resolved guitar strumming, the occasional harmonium wheeze or organ fill, and mournful fiddles. “This World Is Not My Home” features the same neo-Depression genuineness — not to mention the stark instrumentation — of Gillian Welch’s songs, but even when the music doesn’t mimic the sonic quality of Appalachian music, Dondero’s striking country-folk has the visceral punch and wellspring of soul-cleansing emotional depth of that great musical legacy. Other songs are even more whittled to the bone, like the frightfully forlorn “The Lonesomeness That Kills” and the almost narcoleptic “Proposal,” neither of which, to the good credit of Dondero, dwell on the authentic suffering and desolation at their hearts. And that is the wonder of the album. It is never stripped of energy or humor, as a skittery, scatting song like “Pied Piper of the Flying Rats,” with its finger-snapping West Side Story swing, ensures. In fact, Shooting, even in the face of its most forlorn moments, sounds positively triumphant — entirely human. – Stanton Swihart

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