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Corridors And Parallels

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (30 ratings)
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Corridors And Parallels album cover
01
1.
Artist: David S. Ware Quartet
1:20
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02
Straight Track
Artist: David S. Ware Quartet
10:02  
03
Jazz Fi-Sci
Artist: David S. Ware Quartet
4:22
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04
Superimposed
Artist: David S. Ware Quartet
5:58
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05
Sound-A-Bye
Artist: David S. Ware Quartet
3:08
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06
6.
Artist: David S. Ware Quartet
0:37
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07
Corridors And Parallels
Artist: David S. Ware Quartet
8:59
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08
Somewhere
Artist: David S. Ware Quartet
3:11
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09
Spaces Embraces
Artist: David S. Ware Quartet
3:17
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10
Mother May You Rest In Bliss
Artist: David S. Ware Quartet
6:07
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11
11.
Artist: David S. Ware Quartet
1:48
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 48:49

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Ware is up for something new

Marco66

I am quite a David Ware fan, even if sometimes his intensity is not matched by a great deal of musical variety. This is a somewhat unexpected record in his canon (together with Threads, also available on emusic)and it is by all means an interesting step towards new directions. Check for the Shipp's electronics in Jazz Fi-Sci or Superimposed and, most of all, for the title track, the best pick if you don't want all the album. I am waiting for the new Balladsware!

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Electric Ware

mdc

This album is quite unlike Ware's other stuff in terms of instrumentation. It is very much like the rest of his stuff in the passion and emotion it conveys. Shipp and Brown's electronics might seem out of place, but just give this one a chance to sink in.

They Say All Music Guide

Now that David S. Ware seems removed from his relationship with Columbia Records, he turns in his most surprisingly inspired record thus far. Its not that one would expect Corridors & Parallels to be anything less than inspired — as his tone is of the highest spiritual order. With that said, his last studio outing, Surrendered, was a tad on the boring side. While not bad, it veered into very familiar territory for Ware. There’s something quite new with this one though, so don’t be confused by the first few seconds of Corridors — there was no mixup at the pressing plant. Matthew Shipp, who plays organ and synth exclusively (for the first time on record?), opens this disc with organic flowing effects that sound more like the beginning to a Chemical Brothers album. Shortly though, the familiar ringing of William Parker’s bass puts this one back onto the right set. While something new is always fun, it turns out that these electronic sounds that Shipp plays are exactly what the doctor ordered for Ware. He is completely free to let loose with sheets of energy without the consideration of piano comps; meanwhile, Parker and Guillermo E. Brown (who also lends some new percussive rhythms to this set) play with and against each other with intense purpose. There are moments where this is just plain fun, like the conga-line-inspired “Superimposed.” Then there are moments of thick cerebral soup where the group plays with bowed bass, abstract synth, and hypnotic rhythm while Ware sets in for some prolonged and beautiful blowing. This recording is not to missed. – Sam Samuelson

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