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Future Development

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (128 ratings)
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Future Development album cover
01
Lyric Licking
4:48
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02
Stress The World
4:44
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03
Why You Wanna Get Funky...
5:16
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04
Don't Forget The Bass
4:35
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05
Faulty
3:07
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06
X-Files
4:03
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07
Future Development
4:27
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08
Corner Story
4:02
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09
Love Is Worth
4:05
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10
Del's Nightmare
5:19
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11
Games Begin
4:08
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12
Town To Town
7:10
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13
Checkin Out The Rivalry
5:19
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Album Information
EXPLICIT // EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 13   Total Length: 61:03

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Write a Review 6 Member Reviews

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dEL is a mastermind!

complete93

Listening to this album does take me back to 97-98 when I copped it on TAPE!. I had it perpetually loaded into my walkmen. IT was the underladen theme as my footsteps crunched through the Heights. Del made you consider your heart and intetions "Love is WOrth", he made your realize that comin' up ain't the same as bringin' everybody else down, and he taught you to do your homework then go out and kick it. A more 100% hip hop product was never produced! Del is the Mastermind.

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Love Its Worth

alapoet7

I'd put "Why You Wanna Get Funky..." , and "X Files" up against any hip hop ever recorded. To know them is to love them, and once they've gotten in your kitchen they will make your world a better place. As for "Corner Story," it has the feel, the groove, the lyrics, and the beat in such a perfect combination that it may be my single favorite song the Funkee Homosapien has ever dropped. "Love Is Worth" is a sterling call for self-respect and for demanding it of others. How much of today's hip hop tells women (and men) to value themselves highly? And then there's "Del's Nightmare." Never has the plight of the creative, uncompromising, non-trendy hip hop artist ever been so chillingly, tellingly painted. Would you believe that Del can compare the music business to the days of slavery without ever sliding into shrillness or hyperbole?

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YOU DON'T KNOW!?

defjux

This IS the SH!T, I've had it since 97 (when it was only on tape) Listen ti it, memorize it, realize Del's been nice as fucc

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Future Development

Speezmo

I had this album on cassette and wore it out. I couldn't find it again anwhere until I found it here. This is classic Del. Some of his his best older work!

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Worth downloading this rare treasure

ElectroJosh

E-Music is to be commended for making this rare album more widely available. The Hip Hop movement would benefit from more maverik artists like this guy.

They Say All Music Guide

Sort of a stop-gap cassette-only release (available exclusively on the Hieroglyphics web site) between Del’s two original major-label albums and his first independent release on Hieroglyphics’ own Imperium label, the optimistically titled Future Development (which also acts like a promise) doesn’t show any signs of negligence. Nothing here is tossed off or given inattention. What does seem different about the album is that its themes are less serious, more rock-a-party, in the old-school sense: hanging out, scoping girls, making rhymes, telling stories. Instead of the observational seriocomedy of his debut and the acid-psychedelia of the follow-up, Del has lightened the load on his space-holding unofficial third release. Elements of urban commentary and acid dementia (especially the former) are still present, but they seem less front-and-center. As such, the album is less coherent than his previous two albums and less immediate-sounding without being immaterial. The characteristic Funkee Homosapien presence is still apparent, and it is impossible not to find something inviting about it. Del’s voice really does recall his cousin Ice Cube’s deep Southern drawl, but instead of an audible chip on the shoulder, Del is buoyant and fun and, not least of all, lyrically dexterous. He brings the West Coast funk, too-loping, low-end heavy, Saturday-afternoon summer funk — and, as with all things Del, it comes out mutated, alien, and just plain different that anyone else’s hip-hop production, but in this case, far less manic than usual. The affect is a smiling sort of somnolence, almost to the point of jazzy, chill-out hip-hop. Instead of internalizing the stress of the world, Del chooses to “Stress the World” this time around, taking a quick break before he proceeds his future development. – Stanton Swihart

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