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Tryptych

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (33 ratings)
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Tryptych album cover
Disc 1 of 3
01
Forest of Evil (Dusk)
14:29  
02
Forest of Evil (Dawn)
9:22
$0.49
03
Quiet Sky (Bonus Track)
3:38
$0.49
Disc 2 of 3
01
Caged In Stammheim
5:18
$0.49
02
Eurydice
8:08
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03
Regolith
6:00
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04
The Stars Are Moving
8:36
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05
Bardo Thodol
5:35
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06
Matilda's Dream
11:13  
07
Nothing But The Night 2 (Bonus Track)
4:54
$0.49
08
Library Of Solomon Book 1 (Bonus Track)
4:38
$0.49
09
Library Of Solomon Book 2 (Bonus Track)
9:39
$0.49
Disc 3 of 3
01
Black Sun
2:28
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02
Hashshashin Chant
6:20
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03
Repository Of Light
11:21  
04
Of Decay & Shadows
2:37
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05
Rain & Shame
4:16
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06
Desert Ascetic
4:35
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07
Viento de Levante
7:16
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08
Leptonic Matter
4:34
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09
A Tale Of Sand
4:54
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10
Filtered Through Prejudice (Bonus Track)
10:40  
11
Past Is Past (Bonus Track)
9:06
$0.49
Album Information
ALBUM ONLY

Total Tracks: 23   Total Length: 159:37

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Wondering Sound

Review 0

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Lee Smith

Contributor

03.18.11
Entering intense portals of abstract yet weirdly connected atmospheric sound
2011 | Label: Modern Love / Revolver

Miles Whittaker, the "DJ" of the Modern Love operation and one of the first label acts to really investigate the dubstep-techno crossover of recent years, took his fascination with dub-inspired sounds in wild new directions along with Sean Whittaker as Demdike Stare. Their 2009 debut Symbiosis hinted at the doom-tinged drones of dark ambient overlord Tim Hecker, engulfed by dub music's cavernous reverbs and bass thrums, but it was their remarkable Tryptych series of… read more »

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boujeloud

pukey-pete

you're almost an album reviewer! just keep cracking away at that thesaurus buddy!

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When Hipsters Toss the Salad, Beware the Dressing.

boujeloud

As evidenced by the thirty-second samples, the Stare (do we gotta call 'em?) are undeniably capable of breathing out gaseous enigmas which curl up like the Turkish felt slippers of a disinhabited Victorian smoking jacket's detached Kirlian aura, lingering in languour in the oak-beamed office rooms of a former bedlam revamped & gentrified into a modern-art display box, but beyond those flirty thirties, the full tracks have an unfortunate tendency to lapse into glib resolution-by-beat: the overall raver flavour into which each piece gets subsumed is somewhat like falling asleep watching Eraserhead & waking for the final reel of, I dunno, something with Josh Hartnett in? Or Ashton Kutcher. Emusic's ethical position in flogging this as entirely album-only is close to that of a greasy-toppered gin-stinking carny barker who knows full well his bearded lady's wearing a ratty merkin glued to her chin. Don't ever trust a salesman who'll only display his wares where the lighting is dim!

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This is a masterpiece

remittanceman

gutted I paid full whack to download it from another site now.

eMusic Features

0

Editors’ Picks: Quarterly Report

By Wondering Sound Staff, Contributor

Now that we're more than a quarter of the way into 2012, eMusic's editorial department thought we would take a second to survey our favorite albums so far, a dizzying set of records that reflects our team's very different tastes. Seriously though — where else but eMusic would you see the dependable singer-songwriter fare of Anais Mitchell and Sharon Van Etten celebrated on the same page as throwback metal tracks (Christian Mistress) and future-forward electronic… more »

They Say All Music Guide

After releasing a pair of 2009 vinyl EPs — swiftly combined on compact disc as Symbiosis — Sean Canty and Miles Whittaker remained industrious, issuing three titles in small vinyl pressings in 2010. Forest of Evil (April) presented two expansive and unsettling sound collages of swarming drones, rattling techno, and threatening tribal percussion. On the six-track/45-minute Liberation Through Hearing (July), Pole’s gentle dub crackle was pitched into a warehouse blaze, and the percolating bubbles from Herbie Hancock’s “Rain Dance” were transformed into burbling radioactive goo. The first side of Voices of Dust (November) featured two of the trilogy’s most thrilling moments: “Hashshashin Chant,” a feverish tribal track, and “Repository of Light,” where serene spangles bloomed out of industrial hum. Each part of the series gets its own disc for Tryptych, an abnormally sized fold-out package that adds a substantial quantity of new material. These six tracks are spread across the discs, but they amount to a 40-minute set that can be taken as a part four. Compared to the majority of the material on the parent releases, they’re placid, ambient pieces that are not nearly as disturbed but recall the quiet menace of 23 Skidoo’s Urban Gamelan and The Culling Is Coming, as well as the drum-less ambient dub side of Basic Channel. – Andy Kellman

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