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Milo Goes To College

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (268 ratings)
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Milo Goes To College album cover
01
Myage
2:00
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I Wanna Be A Bear
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I'm Not A Loser
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Parents
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Tony Age
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M-16
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I'm Not A Punk
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Catalina
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Suburban Home
1:40
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Statue Of Liberty
1:58
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Kabuki Girl
1:09
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Marriage
1:37
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Hope
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Bikeage
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Jean Is Dead
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 15   Total Length: 22:10

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Wondering Sound

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Michael Azerrad

Contributor

eMusic editor-in-chief Michael Azerrad is the author of Come As You Are: The Story of Nirvana (Doubleday, 1993), which remains the definitive Nirvana biography,...more »

04.22.11
Caffeinated early '80s pop-punk from arguably the most influential SST band ever.
Label: SST Records / The Orchard

The Descendents are arguably the most influential SST band ever: Their catchy, caffeinated punk and candid dispatches from the uneasy front lines of post-adolescence resurfaced — albeit sweetened and diluted — in some of the biggest bands of the '90s and beyond. Redolent of southern California, Buzzcocks-inspired and marked by Milo Aukerman's tonsil-rattling howl, their "chainsaw pop" documents a not always winsome mix of the cynically political ("Statue of Liberty") and the darkly personal ("Hope").… read more »

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Pop punk masterpiece

Areplacement

Great record give it a listen.

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A classic

jtap66

This album is a must-own for anyone who loves punk rock. Agressive, melodic and original. Quite an album for such a young (at the time) band. Today, some of the homophobia makes me cringe...but like it or not, it was a part of the punk scene at the time. Write it off as youthful ignorance and enjoy one of the finest punk rock records of all time.

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The First

countshock

Arguably the greatest punk record of all time. Also, one of the first and best "pop-punk" records. This is how "Pop-Punk" is supposed to sound. changed my life when I was 14.

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if you dont already know

flanhalen

This is the greatest punk album ever released. Milo sing with such heart. Buy it you 12 year old angled hair emo kid and learn some real music. thank you.

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yep!

sandybearings

Best old school American punk band of all time!

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HEY YOUNGSTERS!

Flanhalen

This is the best punk album ever. Period.

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One of ALL of musics best

HardcoreRoolz

An absolutly perfectly constructed album. It was THE best album the year it came out, and has stood the test of time and then some. Many of the greats, groups and albums alike will slowly age and slip to the wayside, but this one shining album will survive this century and beyond, with it's straight forward, no holds barred attitude and agggression, and the fact you live and die on your own two feet, or whatever you have. This album just puts it's classic stamp on it, to "Die free on my feet, or serve on my knees"

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Brilliant, Honest & Fun

chrispy

A simply astonishing piece of so-cal hardcore. Blistering tempos, scream along choruses, yet all rooted in pop melodies. But what sets this album apart is the songwriting on the second half -- they drop the tough, shocking, sometimes homophobic punk pose they promote and start singing about things they really care about. These guys were just teenagers when they wrote this and songs like Marriage, Bikeage, and Jean is Dead are songs about things every teen can relate to -- the girls who reject them for guys with drugs and cars, the girl they are going to marry and save, and most harrowingly, a friend who has committed suicide. Sounds commonplace nowadays, but the language they use is so forthright and direct. When Milo sings 'Now you're gone and I'm alone' during Jean is Dead, you'll understand. Groundbreaking.

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Audacity got a head start on their career — their two singer/guitarists, Matt Schmalfeld and Kyle Gibson, have been playing together in one band or another since they met in elementary school in 2002. Over the past decade or so, the quartet has become a force in modern garage-punk, both on their own and as the backup band for other artists, including King Tuff (their former labelmate on Burger Records, which also released the first… more »

They Say All Music Guide

And indeed, since he was heading off to do just that, the Descendents bowed out the earliest phase of its existence with another collection of blink-and-you’ll-miss-it songs about life, love, girls, losers, and, of course, food. Starting with the classic rip-and-riff of “Myage,” which started a long-standing trend of Descendents songs ending with “-age,” the four-piece pureed everything it loved — pop hooks, punk and hardcore thrash, and whatever else it enjoyed — and came up with an unpretentious, catchy winner. The playing of the core band is even better than before, never mistaking increased skill with needing to show off; the Lombardo/Stevenson rhythm section is in perfect sync, while Navetta provides the corrosive power. Add in Aukerman’s in-your-face hilarity and f*ck-off stance, and it’s punk rock that wears both its adolescence and brains on its sleeve. Aukerman lets his heart slip through more than once amid all the hilarious descriptions and putdowns, like the slow-burn introduction to “Catalina,” with Navetta’s guitar the perfect snarling counterpoint. There are a couple of moments where the band’s young age is all too obvious — the trendoids slammed in “Loser” deserve the total trashing given, but the casual homophobia is unfortunate no matter where you stand. As for “Kabuki Girl,” you’ve got to wonder. Generally, though, this is smart, sly music and words coming from people interested in creating their own lives and style as opposed to following trends. There’s “Tonyage,” another rant against punk/new wave wannabes who “were all surfers last year”; the wise-in-advance-of-its-years “I’m Not a Punk,” perhaps the band’s greatest song; and the power-singalong “Suburban Home,” with its spoken-word start and ending, “I want to be stereotyped, I want to be classified!” The music never stops, neither does the energy — an instant party album of its own kind. – Ned Raggett

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