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Farm

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (1093 ratings)
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Farm album cover
01
Pieces
4:32
$0.49
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02
I Want You To Know
4:30
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03
Oceans In The Way
4:20
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04
Plans
6:42
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05
Your Weather
3:06
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06
Over It
3:47
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07
Friends
4:32
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08
Said The People
7:42
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09
There's No Here
3:39
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10
See You
5:48
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11
I Don't Wanna Go There
8:43
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12
Imagination Blind
3:22
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 60:43

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user avatar

Brilliant.

Blackbeardo

The only thing that's surprising about this record is that it's just as vital as BUG. As I've said before, this triad was meant to make loud melodic noise together, like the Beatles or Radiohead. It's a shame they were apart for 15 years, but then again, it's hard to be down over a SECOND great reunion album. FAVES: "Pieces", "Over It", "Oceans In The Way", "Your Weather."

user avatar

Well worth the credits

boffothesane

I only knew this band from their Guitar Hero song. Still on the fence after listening to the samples, I decided to take a chance. It does not disappoint and it gets better every time you listen. Such expressive guitar work, I sometimes weep openly.

user avatar

UMMM... YEAH!!!

rockyfour4

Yeah I would have to say after 20 plus years together... These guys still kill it! J Masics guitar is still moving and inspiring after all these years.

user avatar

not so much

charlie4feet

I tried to like it. Just never struck a chord with me. Seems really mediocre to me. Can't give it 5 stars just for the sake of the band.

user avatar

Muscled Rock

Warrior4x

There is always a lot of sonic energy when Jr. cranks up. Pace yourself, because this album will flat wear you out with it distorted chords and heavy rhythms. Need a little juice to get through the afternoon arsenic hours, load these 12 tracks and time clears.

user avatar

Hello Again

kneehigh

I'm rocking this record multiple times a day and loving it. I was heavy into "Green Mind" and this album did not disappoint. Better than "Beyond" I think.

user avatar

Classic D-Jr.

esibley

Yup, this album rocks. I've been a fan for a while and there's nothing to disappoint here. I don't like their slow tunes as much, but I can still appreciate them. Check it out!

user avatar

An instant believer...

GreatStature

I'd never really taken the time to listen to Dino Jr. but thanks to eMusic I downloaded their latest. It's great: I can see how they were influenced by Neil Young and I can see how they've themselves influenced grunge. They are a perfect bridge between two of my favorite artists/genre's.

user avatar

Awesome.

scrapps

These guys rock my arse off!

user avatar

They still have it.

Bozo

But then, I'm locally prejudiced.

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By Jess Harvell, Contributor

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They Say All Music Guide

If Farm lacks the element of surprise of Dinosaur Jr.’s 2007 comeback, Beyond, that’s just about the only thing it lacks: in every other respect it is its equal, a muscular, melodic monster that stands among the best albums the band has made. Again, what impresses is a combination of vigor and consistency, consistency not only in regards to the songs on Farm, but how it picks up on the thread running throughout the band’s career, feeling as if it could have arrived in the early ’90s, minus some subtle distinctions in production and attitude. As on Beyond, Dinosaur Jr.’s assuredness is striking; Mascis may drawl that he “did it wrong” on the pre-chorus of “There’s No Here,” but once again his tongue is firmly in cheek, and any traces self-mythologizing slackerdom are steamrollered by the band’s roar. As good as the songwriting is — and it’s as strong as it was on Beyond, as Mascis alternates between molten rock & roll (“Pieces”), fuzzy pop gems (“Over It” and “I Want to Know”), and churning slow burns (“Ocean in the Way”), while Lou Barlow throws in two strong numbers — the real rush of Farm comes from the band’s interplay, how the group locks together and rides the wave, sometimes taking upwards of seven or eight minutes to get where they’re going. Although there have been imitators and disciples, this is a sound that’s utterly unique to Dinosaur Jr., and what’s different about them in their reunion is that the group not only realizes their individuality, they revel in it, getting lost in the noise, and it’s hard not to get swept up with it, too. – Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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