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Taking The Long Way

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (243 ratings)
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Taking The Long Way album cover
01
The Long Way Around
4:33
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02
Easy Silence
4:02
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03
Not Ready To Make Nice
3:58
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04
Everybody Knows
4:18
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05
Bitter End
4:38
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06
Lullaby
5:51
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07
Lubbock or Leave It
3:54
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08
Silent House
5:23
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09
Favorite Year
4:29
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10
Voice Inside My Head
5:52
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11
I Like It
4:34
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12
Baby Hold On
5:04
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13
So Hard
4:27
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14
I Hope
5:25
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 14   Total Length: 66:28

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First tracks are sadly bitter

WellDoneTracks

I am a big fan/frequent listener, but I found the first part of the album difficult to survive their bitterness and protestations. I never thought artist opinions were anything more valuable or valid than anyone else but was glad when they moved on in the later songs.

user avatar

Look past the politics, find a remarkable album

svenden

I bought this album when it was released out of some vain attempt to stick it to their pro-Bush critics. But the novelty of all that drama quickly passed. I'm still listening to this album years later because of the amazing songwriting. Of note are The Long Way Around, an insanely infectious road anthem, and Silent House, a beautiful alzheimers tribute. But Easy Silence stands above them all. On the surface its a protest song, but at its core a love song: Children lose their youth too soon/Watching war made us immune/And I've got all the world to lose/But I just want to hold on to the/Easy silence that you make for me. The best protest songs don't lecture, they tap into the feelings at the core of the anger; this song nails that. It is soft, sweet and stinging all at once. Dan Wilson (who deserves oodles of kudos for his work on this album) and the Chicks have here a masterpiece, which is even more worthy of a Grammy than its deserving successor on the album, Not Ready to Make Nice.

user avatar

Another Great Album

brhee

I have always loved the harmonies and the way that The Chicks can belt out a song. I am glad to see they are back and on E-Music. I have to admit one of my favorites is "Not Ready to Make Nice"- but I have seldom found a song on any of their albums that I didn't like.

user avatar

Great Comeback

EMUSIC-004555C1

Finally, Natalie has taken control again, and the results can be heard on this spectacular comeback album. The Chicks are at their best when Natalie takes the lead, and she has done so well in this CD. A must have for any Chicks fan.

user avatar

Going to the next level

drisc2000

I've always loved the Dixie Chicks. The vocals, the great arrangements and the incredible energy. Each album they have put out seems like another step progression from a hot bluegrass/country band to a true music powerhouse, all along keeping true to their basic appeal with Natalie's great lead signing, sweet harmonies and great instrumental leads by the "Chicks" and the backup musicians led by Natalie's dad. Great stuff!

user avatar

Paul from Boston

PauFromBataanRP

Now that Natalie only opens her mouth to sing,their back on top. I for one never left them over the "Bush" fallout.

user avatar

Fantastic Powerful Album

MusicalOmnivore

So many people with enlightened tastes in music criminally underrate and/or dismiss the Dixie Chicks as a pop country marketing act, but I have been a fan since day one and this is truly a great and moving album. They are excellent musicians and Natalie's voice is phenomenal.

Recommended Albums

They Say All Music Guide

The road leading away from Home, the Dixie Chicks’ acclaimed 2002 return to straight-ahead country, proved to be quite rocky for the Texan trio, largely due to anti-George W. Bush and antiwar comments lead singer Natalie Maines made during the long crawl to the 2003 Iraqi War. Maines’ words, initially spoken off the cuff in concert but then repeated in numerous interviews, earned her plenty of enemies within the country community (most notably Toby Keith), but despite the hailstorm of publicity, Maines, Martie Maguire, and Emily Robison did not back down, even as their country audience slowly diminished. But by that point, the Dixie Chicks were bigger than a mere country act anyway: they were international superstars. Their sound and sensibility played to an audience that was much bigger and more self-consciously sophisticated than the country audience, so their shift from country to pop on 2006′s Taking the Long Way feels natural; even the neo-bluegrass of Home felt like a kindred spirit to the alt-country movement and such AAA singer/songwriters as Sheryl Crow, not the pure bluegrass of Ricky Skaggs, or even the progressive Alison Krauss. Given the controversy of 2003, the conscious distancing from country makes sense — and given songs like the defiant “Not Ready to Make Nice” and the redneck-baiting “Lubbock or Live It,” the Dixie Chicks don’t sound like they’re in retreat on Taking the Long Way, either; they merely sound like they’re being themselves. And Taking the Long Way is as genuine a Dixie Chicks album as Home or Wide Open Spaces, feeling like an accurate reflection of the trio’s current life. They are now savvy, sophisticated urbanites — the album cover makes it seem like they’ve stepped out of Sex and the City — and the music reflects that. It’s rooted in country — or more specifically country-rock — and it wouldn’t sound out of place in Nashville, but sounds more suited for upscale apartments and coffeehouses. The sound might be a little more NPR than hot country, but the trio’s harmonies still shine brightly, they still play with conviction, and they still have a strong body of songs here. No doubt reflecting the influence of producer Rick Rubin, the Chicks work with songwriters well outside of the Music Row mainstream: naturally, Sheryl Crow makes an appearance as a co-writer here, but so does acclaimed pop tunesmith Neil Finn, alt-country mainstay Gary Louris, bluesman Keb’ Mo’, Heartbreaker Mike Campbell, and through much of the album, Semisonic/Trip Shakespeare frontman Dan Wilson. All are accomplished songwriters whose strengths may not seem to lie in country, but they all know how to structure a song, and they help give the group direction and the album focus. Rubin’s skill on picking collaborators for the trio makes up for his typically flat production — it’s clean and classy but not colorful, which it begs to be, given that this is a pop album filled with different styles and textures from rollicking rock & roll to soulful laments to sweet ballads. But this lack of zest in the production is forgivable because Taking the Long Way is otherwise a strong, confident affair that is far from suggesting the Dixie Chicks are being cowardly for moving away from country. Rather, they’re bravely asserting their identity through this varied, successful crossover move. – Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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