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Supreme Jazz - Dizzy Gillespie

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Supreme Jazz - Dizzy Gillespie album cover
01
It Don't Mean a Thing
6:36  
02
I Let a Song Go Out of My Heart
6:15  
03
Girl of My Dreams
3:16  
04
Impromptu
7:46  
05
Doodlin'
3:53  
06
Stella By Starlight
4:05  
07
A Night in Tunisia
5:31  
08
Tour De Force
5:01  
09
The Champ
4:40  
10
Yesterdays
3:43  
11
Groovin' for Nat
3:18  
12
Annie's Dance
4:02  
13
Dizzy's Blues
2:30  
Album Information

Total Tracks: 13   Total Length: 60:36

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