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The Doc Watson Family

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The Doc Watson Family album cover
01
Ground Hog
2:21
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02
Every Day Dirt
2:08
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Bonaparte's Retreat
1:31
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04
The House Carpenter
4:33
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05
I'm Troubled
2:42
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Your Long Journey
2:36
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When I Die
2:17
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08
That Train That Carried My Girl from Town
2:20
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Down the Road
1:41
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The Lone Pilgrim
3:08
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Texas Gales / Blackberry Rag (medley)
1:58
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Darling Corey
2:37
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The Triplett Tragedy
5:31
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Muddy Roads
1:24
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The Lost Soul
3:01
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Keep in the Middle of the Road
1:14
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The Old Man Below
1:35
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Pretty Saro
1:42
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Cousin Sally Brown
2:20
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Look Down That Lonesome Road
2:06
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Doodle Bug
1:02
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Rambling Hobo
1:38
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The Cuckoo Bird
3:03
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Frosty Morn
1:41
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Shady Grove
2:17
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Southbound
2:40
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 26   Total Length: 61:06

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Wondering Sound

Review 37

John Morthland

Contributor

John Morthland has been writing about music since the days of electronically rechanneled stereo and duophonic sound. His name has darkened the mastheads of Roll...more »

04.22.11
Doc Watson, The Doc Watson Family
Label: Smithsonian Folkways

Though I've always been seduced by the intimacy of what's now titled The Original Folkways Recordings of Doc Watson and Clarence Ashley: 1960-1962, even that doesn't quite measure up to this 1963 follow-up. The North Carolina flat-picker was one of the two or three most influential folk-country guitarists of the last half century or so, and a seemingly bottomless repository of traditional music, though he retained a healthy respect for other forms (he was… read more »

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Old time music

Jackthepicker

Doc Watson does the roots music that underlies modern country, folk, and even blues as well as anyone. He's joined here with family members who add dimension and show where he came by some of the tracks that he's recorded over the years. He manages to stay true to his roots and bring the music of the mountains to a new generation. Good music.

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Powerful

EMUSIC-00CFE3DA

It's surprising how often simple cuts from this legend hit an emotional cord.

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w00t!

ahbe

Wonderful album. A truly moving compilation. If nothing else listen to the first track, Ground Hog. If that doesn't bring a smile to your face, you might be dead.

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Simple and Powerful

AcousticListener

I feel like I'm in the kitchen with these folks when I listen to this album. This is primitive music, and that's where its beauty lies. Doc Watson doesn't even play that much guitar, from what I can tell - lots of fiddle and singing. If you don't want to grab the whole album, at least listen (really listen) to "Your Long Journey."

They Say All Music Guide

Doc Watson, grandfather of the folk revival movement, has had a profound influence on American traditional music. Not only did he pioneer the playing of fiddle tunes on a flattop guitar, but through his incessant touring has brought traditional music to a larger audience. This Smithsonian Folkways release captures not only Doc Watson, but almost a dozen family members at the height of their power and has been deservingly hailed as a classic recording. Right from the opening track, “Old Groundhog,” Watson and family send the listener on an amazing journey into the American musical past and present. Incidentally, their performance of “Old Groundhog” is certainly the equal of Bascom Lamar Lunsford’s “I Wish I Was a Mole in the Ground,” in terms of surreal country, capturing as it does race relations, commentary on shoe strings, as well directions for catching a groundhog. On “The House Carpenter,” a weepy tale of that conflates religious and personal love, a haunting female voice sings almost off-key accompanied only by a fiddle that doubles on the melody. On the instrumental “Bonaparte’s Retreat,” Watson offers a droning, sea shanty-influenced version of this song staple of Mississippi river communities. Some of the family’s best work is found in the spirituals scattered about the album. “When I Die” features a beautiful, uplifting three-part harmony, as does “The Lost Soul,” which contains the wickedly abject refrain, “I’m paying now/the penalty.” A fabulous record that’s a must-listen for any serious fan of American music. – Brian Whitener

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