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Mu First Part / Mu Second Part

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Mu First Part / Mu Second Part album cover
01
Brilliant Action
8:44
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02
Amejelo
7:29
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03
Total Vibration
9:28
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04
Sun Of The East
7:54
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05
Terrestrial Beings
4:35
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06
The Mysticism Of My Sound
3:53
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07
Medley: Dollar Brand / Spontaneous Composing / Exert Man On The Moon
2:43
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08
Bamboo Night
7:00
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09
Teo Teo Can
6:04
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10
Smiling Faces Going Places
4:42
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11
Psycho Drama
2:23
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12
Medley: Theme Albert Heath / Theme Dollar Brand / Babyrest Time For
4:01
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 68:56

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I love Don Cherry

piglittle

When I first heard this recording, so long ago, it seemed so natural to me - like breathing. Beautiful

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classic duet

krowseye

From the early 1960s. Beautiful pairing of Cherry & Blackwell, a blueprint for subsequent efforts like Leroy Jenkins/Rashied Ali's Swift are the Winds of Life

eMusic Features

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Don Cherry: Pied Piper with a Pocket Trumpet

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

Don Cherry began to make his mark with his first recording session, on February 10, 1958, as foil for freebopping alto saxophonist Ornette Coleman on music recorded for Something Else! Their bebop forebears Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker favored rough-sounding unison melodies, a departure from the swing era's smooth blends, but the Coleman-Cherry mix was scrappier still. As soloist, Don took cues from how Ornette's solos didn't track a tune's harmonies too closely. They didn't… more »

They Say All Music Guide

This classic pair of recordings, reissued as a single CD, captures Don Cherry near the height of his global quest to absorb as much music as possible from different cultures and funnel it back through his jazz sensibility. It’s one of the earliest, and most successful, experiments in what would later come to be known as world music. He wisely chose his fellow Ornette Coleman cohort Ed Blackwell — a drummer steeped in the traditions of New Orleans, African music, and free jazz — for his partner. Despite his reputation as a trumpeter, Cherry spends a great deal of time here on piano, flutes, and vocals. His piano playing, while relatively simple, is fluid and melodic, owing a good deal to Abdullah Ibrahim (who is represented here with a couple of his themes). Likewise, his singing — heavily influenced by Indian karnatic song — is endearingly bright, heartfelt, and lovely. But, above all, his trumpet playing is stellar. When Cherry hits his ringing, clarion passages, he projects a purity of sound that few other trumpeters could match. Blackwell matches him sound for sound, with rolling West African-derived rhythms, Basin Street marches, and the most overtly musical tone of any drummer this side of Max Roach. The Mu sessions have long held legendary status and it’s not difficult to hear why. Highly recommended. – Brian Olewnick

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