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Doctors Orders

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Doctors Orders album cover
01
Close But No Cigar
3:10
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02
So Long
3:57
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03
You Don't Love Me
2:55
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04
My Way
2:33
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05
Neighbour, Neighbour
3:20
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06
Talk Of The Devil
3:28
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07
Hit Git And Split
2:34
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08
I Can't Be Satisfied
3:28
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09
Saturday Night Fish Fry
3:47
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10
Drivin' Wheel
3:34
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11
It Ain't Right
2:31
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12
I Don't Worry About A Thing
2:50
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13
She's In The Middle
2:46
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14
Dangerous
4:07
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 14   Total Length: 45:00

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Incorrect AMG Review

wellyblues

The AMG review is for the Brilleaux album. Here's the AMG review for Doctor's Orders: "Lee Brilleaux returned with a completely new lineup of Dr. Feelgood for Doctor's Orders, a record that returned the band to its piledriving R&B and rock & roll roots. At this stage, the band sounds more accomplished and professional than ever before -- there's little of the wild energy that distinguished their first records -- but that's actually not a bad thing, because they have enough sensibility to be skilled, not slick. Supported by the new band, Brilleaux manages to turn in the grittiest Dr. Feelgood record in years, making Doctor's Orders a fine comeback from a band that seemed to have lost the plot. " But the track listing on AMG is completely different, and they have the wrong cover. Confused?

They Say All Music Guide

Lee Brilleaux invested in the groundbreaking British independent label Stiff when it was being launched in the mid-’70s, so it is sort of appropriate that Dr. Feelgood eventually recorded for the label. The only trouble is, it wasn’t in 1976, when Stiff and Feelgood were at their peak; it was in 1986, as Stiff was sliding toward bankruptcy and Feelgood were far from their popular heyday. Dave Robinson, in his infinite wisdom, decided that the way to restore both his label and the band to their proper glories was by refashioning them as radio-ready, R&B-tinged popsters. Of course, that ran contrary to the group’s entire career, but they decided to follow his advice, and with producer Will Birch, the group assembled their most eclectic batch of songs ever. Although the smoother sound strips much of Feelgood’s gritty essence, Brilleaux remains a varied, entertaining record — it’s a welcome change of pace from the driving rockers, even if it wasn’t welcomed by radio as originally planned. [The 2006 CD reissue includes bonus tracks.] – Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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