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Masters Of Jazz

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01
Take The A Train
3:03
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02
Blow Boy Blow
4:29
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03
Medley: It Don't Mean A ...
11:39  
04
Kinda Dukish
3:42
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05
Things Ain't What They Used To Be
2:45
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06
Satin Doll
3:25
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07
New World A-Comin'
8:27
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08
VIP Boogie/Jam With Sam
6:36
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09
The Good Years Of Jazz
1:23
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10
What Am I Here For?
3:37
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11
Johnny Come Lately
2:53
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12
Main Stem (Altitude)
3:02
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13
Ring Dem Bells
2:56
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14
Rockin' In Rhythm
4:51
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15
Do Nothing 'Till You Hear From Me
3:22
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16
Just A-Sittin' And A-Rockin'
3:19
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17
C Jam Blues
3:25
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18
Cotton Tail
3:44
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 18   Total Length: 76:38

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Six Degrees of Duke Ellington’s Money Jungle

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

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They Say All Music Guide

While tempted to call this collection of tracks by Duke Ellington & His Orchestra a hodgepodge, it’s more like a mishmash. The music here — 18 cuts worth — is presented in strange fashion. First, it’s from all different periods ranging from 1943 to 1966 (the latest cut chronologically is a solo piano read of a medley of Duke’s finest). It’s not presented in chronological order either, but was sequenced aesthetically instead. The first pieces, “Take the ‘A’ Train” and “Blow Boy Blow,” are from 1962 when the band, while not in its prime, did contain a number of startling players including Cat Anderson and Ray Nance on trumpets, Paul Gonsalves and Johnny Hodges on saxophones, and Sam Woodyard and Harry Carney on drums and bass, respectively. These tunes swing hard, though the sound quality is a little ragged. The treasure piece here is the aforementioned solo piano medley recorded in Paris in 1966, with Ellington moving through “It Don’t Mean a Thing,” “Satin Doll,” “Sophisticated Lady,” “I Got It Bad (And That Ain’t Good),” “Mood Indigo,” and “Caravan,” just to name a few. At nearly 12 minutes, it is excellent intimate Ellington. The remainder of the material comes from either 1943 or 1949, including a number of cuts with Ben Webster and Juan Tizol, recorded at either Carnegie Hall or the Hollywood Empire. Al Hibbler is featured on some of the 1943 dates singing “Do Nothin’ Till You Hear from Me,” “Rockin’ in Rhythm,” and “Ring Dem Bells.” The sound quality varies but the performances are excellent throughout. This is for the collectors out there searching for rare material. – Thom Jurek

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