|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

I Will Be

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (329 ratings)
Retail
Member
I Will Be album cover
01
It Only Takes One Night
2:04
$0.49
$0.99
02
Bhang, Bhang, I'm a Burnout
2:36
$0.49
$0.99
03
Oh Mein M
2:14
$0.49
$0.99
04
Jail La La
2:33
$0.49
$0.99
05
Rest of Our Lives
3:04
$0.49
$0.99
06
Yours Alone
2:18
$0.49
$0.99
07
Blank Girl
2:56
$0.49
$0.99
08
I Will Be
2:09
$0.49
$0.99
09
Lines Her Eyes
2:26
$0.49
$0.99
10
Everybody's Out
3:00
$0.49
$0.99
11
Baby Don't Go
3:50
$0.49
$0.99
Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 29:10

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Write a Review 10 Member Reviews

Please register before you review a release. Register

user avatar

I Will Be

chasveitch

Poor quality, sounds like a recording from backstage.

user avatar

eMusic brings great sadness to my heart

TSnook1969

This is the kind of music that used to make me happy to be an eMusic member. Now you can buy this same recording on Amazon for $5.00. The extra $1.99 eMusic charges has put me on the edge of being an ex-member.

user avatar

good but

bigsteveno

I didn't like this as much as I thought I would. There's talent there for sure, but there's really room for development.

user avatar

Have to Agree with Arpee

saradevil

Lo-fi is just an excuse for singers who are afraid of really putting their work behind their own voices. This is not to say I don't like lo-fi, on one or two tracks, sure. When you do the entire freaking album that way, though, come on, it's a cop out. This album would be nice if there were one or two tracks that sounded even remotely different, but thanks to the over-synth it's just an "eh"

user avatar

Quality

johnredrum

I guess you all miss the point. With the technology around, you can make anything sound how you want, and this is their choice. sounds no different than Lush, Curve, and other early 90's noise pop. I dig it.

user avatar

Its called...

thelittlefield

...lo-fi, dipshit. Please take note for future reference.

user avatar

Yeeech!

Arpee

With all the technology out there enabling musicians to make good recordings, there's no excuse for the lousy quality here. It doesn't enhance the "indie-punk" quality, it just make it sound like it was recorded in a closet (the one pictured?) on a little tinny analog recorder. Ugh. Give this a miss.

user avatar

Poor Recording

IndieKidAlli

I can't say if I like this or not, the quality of the recording is so poor I can't listen to the music

user avatar

Worst song

capools

This is one of the worst songs I have ever heard. It's hard to believe someone would listen to this.

user avatar

spaces me out

ToddusofKnox

this spaces me out- in a good way

eMusic Features

0

Interview: Dum Dum Girls

By Andrew Parks, Contributor

"It's frustrating to learn the guitar, because you suck so bad for the first week or two," explains Dee Dee Penny, the singer/songwriter at the center of Dum Dum Girls. "I could not handle sucking, so I just said, 'Fuck that.'" That was about 18 years ago, when Penny still went by the name Kristin Gundred and based most of her chord progressions around the buzzsaw riffs of Nirvana and Smashing Pumpkins. In the vaguely… more »

0

New Adventures in Hi-Fi

By David Greenwald, Contributor

D.I.Y. and hi-fi have rarely gone hand in hand. From the muscular crackle of Black Flag to the basement anthems of Guided by Voices, the sound of indie rock has long been the proudly noisy product of four walls and a four-track recorder. As laptops have replaced boomboxes, the aesthetic has endured, with bands embracing digital fuzz as a signal of both outsider cool and a thin wallet. But with the late-2000s lo-fi boom that launched… more »

1

2011: Garage Rock Grows Up

By Mike McGonigal, Contributor

Four years ago, I flew from Portland to New York to see my favorite band, New Zealand's garage-pop trio the Clean, play three shows at a glorious pit called Cake Shop. The openers were Crystal Stilts, a Brooklyn group with no records out whose moody and noisy music pushed all the right buttons. I quickly befriended the group, especially guitarist JB Townsend and his then-girlfriend Frankie Rose, whose own band Vivian Girls were soon-to-be favorites.… more »

0

Who Are…Wax Idols

By Barry Walters, Contributor

While Best Coast's Bethany Cosentino radiates all the sunny musical signposts of her native Los Angeles — specifically, surf guitar riffs and beach-buoyant harmonies — Wax Idols' Oakland transplant Hether Fortune sings, writes and generates a sound that references several decades of dark British alt-rock, albeit with a contemporary DIY spirit. Like other buzzy Bay Area bands, Fortune and her supporting players prove that punk and pop can still come together without going corporate. eMusic's Barry… more »

0

CMJ Report: Who Won the Week

By J. Edward Keyes, Editor-in-Chief

Over the course of the last several years, so much time and space has been given over to questioning the value and relevance of New York's CMJ Festival that it hardly seems worthwhile to repeat the process here. The festival - now in its third decade - still puts forth a serviceable lineup of bands for anyone interested enough in burning the better part of a week shuttling from one end of the city to… more »

0

Interview: Dum Dum Girls

By Marissa G. Muller, Contributor

Dum Dum Girls may borrow their aesthetic from '60s girl groups, but their crackling guitar-pop doesn't sound dated, especially when it touches darker themes. "This year's been a drag/ Who knew it'd be so bad," Dee Dee sings in "Caught in One" — and she's not kidding. Written during the last days of her mother's struggle with terminal cancer, Only in Dreams explores emotional volatility, but never surrenders or collapses. It is Dee Dee's most… more »

0

Label Profile: HoZac Records

By Austin L. Ray, Contributor

File Under: Trashy garage rock and punk, with a smattering of catchy pop Flagship Acts: Smith Westerns, Dum Dum Girls, Woven Bones, Box Elders, Wizzard Sleeve Based In: Chicago, Illinois In less than five years, Chicago's HoZac has released close to 80 records, and while it's easy to categorize the majority of that batch under the nebulous "garage/punk" umbrella, the label has dabbled in pop and folk as well. In fact, the Windy City imprint's catalog is all… more »

0

Label Profile: Captured Tracks

By J. Edward Keyes, Editor-in-Chief

File Under: Ragged, guitar-based indie pop; jangle-'n'-reverb forever! Flagship Acts: Beach Fossils, Wild Nothing, the Fresh & Onlys, the Girls At Dawn Based In: Brooklyn, New York When I first meet Mike Sniper, he's drinking Patron Silver at an Oyster Bar in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. From any other record executive, the scene would be typical to the point of almost seeming mundane. But Sniper is the founder of the tiny, ragged Brooklyn indie Captured Tracks, a label that prizes… more »

0

Who Are…Male Bonding

By Douglas Wolk, Contributor

The shortest song on Male Bonding's full-length debut, Nothing Hurts, is a frantic 89 seconds long; the longest is still comfortably under the three-minute barrier. Formed by three former record-store co-workers, they're way too caffeinated and enthusiastic to bother with anything that doesn't get straight to the point, and their songs sprint noisily from hook to hook to finish line. As you might expect, they're hardcore music geeks — they run a label in their… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Dum Dum Girls began with Dee Dee (no last name provided) recording short, noisy tracks in her bedroom. These lo-fi recordings (as heard on a self-released CD-R, a single on Hozac, and a 12” on Captured Tracks) blended girl group melodies with Jesus and Mary Chain noise, Ramones-simple tunes with Dee Dee’s darkly sweet vocals, and came up with a sound deeply indebted to the past but also very much its own. For Dum Dum Girls’ first album, I Will Be, Dee Dee recorded the tracks herself but then sent them to famed producer Richard Gottehrer (Blondie, the Go-Go’s) to produce. Anyone expecting/fearing a glossy product to be the result will be glad to know that barely any noise or hiss has been sacrificed. The sound on I Will Be is just as gritty and cheap-sounding as Dee Dee’s bedroom recordings; the only differences are that the music is given a little more air to breathe with slightly more air between the instruments, and Dee Dee’s vocals are more up-front. The songs show no drop-off from her early recordings; the ten self-penned songs are just as catchy as anything she’s done. A couple could even be radio hits — if the world of radio were suddenly turned upside-down and super hooky noise pop songs about jail (“Jail La La”) and drugs (“Bhang Bhang, I’m a Burnout”) were getting steady airplay. Mixed in with the uptempo sunny rockers that make up the bulk of the record are a couple of nice ballads that demonstrate Dum Dum Girls’ range a little. The best of them is the lovely cover of the Sonny & Cher gem “Baby Don’t Go,” but the song “Blank Girl,” which Dee Dee sings with her husband Brandon (of Crocodiles), isn’t far behind. The only possible flaw of the album is that the songs all sound the same. The drum machine, the guitars, the vocals, and even the song structures don’t vary much; Gottehrer’s production didn’t really address that issue. Luckily, the album rushes by so quickly and the basic sonic template is so good that it never really becomes an issue. For the next album, it will be nice to hear Dee Dee incorporate the bandmates she joined up with after the recording of I Will Be, but here the limited sonic palette works just fine. The record isn’t a complete knockout, but it’s a nice consolidation of the Dum Dum Girls sound to date and a fine starting point in what could be a nice string of noise pop records. – Tim Sendra

more »