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Wants, World, Women

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (81 ratings)
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Wants, World, Women album cover
01
Wants (Intro)
1:20
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02
I Wish
3:07
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03
Grown
3:49
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04
Dodgin' Your Phone (feat. David Banner)
5:40
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05
Dim The Lights (feat. Raheem DeVaughn)
4:32
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06
World (Intro)
1:07
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07
How I Deal (feat. Slum Village)
3:43
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08
Hangover
3:07
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09
My People
4:27
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10
Detroit Sunrise (feat. Monica Blaire & Lloyd Dwayne)
3:36
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11
Women (Intro)
0:41
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12
I Understand
4:35
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13
Love You Right
3:49
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14
"More Than A" (Interlude)
0:46
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15
What's Not To Love
3:26
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16
Give Me A Chance
3:38
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17
I Wanna (feat. DJ Quik)
4:16
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 17   Total Length: 55:39

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Write a Review 11 Member Reviews

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Pretty Good

NeoSoulMe

This new release is o.k. He makes decent music and stays in touch with true R&B roots.

user avatar

A Step Backwards

griffinanthony

Dwele has been an artist I've enjoyed since his start but I'm sorry this album is more commericalize than any of his other albums. Track 15 is the only song I can see myself listening to over & over as for the rest no. But still enjoy him as an artist.

user avatar

This is R&B

winstonmalonis

For those young Katz who are trying to do grown up R&B, this album should be your muse. Wow Dwele's best work so far!

user avatar

He brings it every time

Paulexander

I don't know how he does it, one great album after another. Many others would be slacking off by now, but no, every new album is great.

user avatar

Good album nonetheless

Trusense

A couple of skippers but has a little bit of everything for all Dwele fans

user avatar

grown & sexy g-funk?

Know1

dwele's "new," west coast hip hop-influenced production style (ala dj quik), with its handclap snares, etc. loses me. fortunately he returns to form by "hangover" and finishes strong.

user avatar

Dwele Does it Again!

lj2kplus

This is a nice follow up to "Sketches of a Man." Here we get to see Dwele in a different light as he travels between the three topics in the album title. The first single What's Not To Love is definitely captivating. Other favs for me are Dodgin' Your Phone, Dim The Lights and My People. If you are looking for some smooth grooves you definitely want to check this out!

user avatar

NEO SOUL

ANGEL01

Classic Dwele Style. A great buy and great music.

user avatar

Awesome

EMUSIC-0083D900

His music is so smooth. You will not be disappointed.

user avatar

FANTASTIC

Bunneh3000

This album could easily be his best. I can see a bit of Raheem in this album even with the featured appearance. Here Dwele showed his non-beat machine side and did a lot of live instrumentation which goes well with his style bein a multi-instrumentalist. He also managed to stay clear of excessive slow songs that seemed to steer people away from him. Still, he managed to stay sexy when he needed to!

They Say All Music Guide

Dwele organizes the songs of his fourth album into thematic thirds. The conceptual presentation isn’t merely cosmetic. If it was pre-planned as a means to foster a set that is distinct, not just lyrically but also sonically, in relation to Subject, Some Kinda…, and Sketches of a Man, it worked. The opening third is mostly lighthearted and gets a little steamy in places. In “I Wish,” over a surprisingly frictious beat, Dwele directly addresses his predicament as a low-key cult artist: “I wish I had a dollar for every dollar you think I have”; “I wish I made music that appeals to the masses/Instead of writing lyrics that require poetic classes.” During the lengthy interlude between “Dodgin’ Your Phone” and “Dim the Lights,” Dwele goes back to his roots by slipping into MC mode. While it’s doubtful he will pull a reverse Phonte and join a rap group, he’s convincing with his swift, droning flow and leaves the vocal hook to Raheem DeVaughn, whose socially oriented Love & War MasterPeace could have been a contemporary inspiration for the album’s outward second segment. Dwele delves into economic desperation and survival in the physical sense, but tempers his cold realism with an uplifting tribute to his hometown. The first two-thirds are strong, but the closing third gets back to what Dwele does best of all. The last 20 minutes contain a handful of his sweetest love songs, and they possess that all-too-scarce combination of cool confidence and genuine empathy — not to mention the kinds of relaxed grooves that reveal nuances with each listen. – Andy Kellman

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