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The Eminem Show

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The Eminem Show album cover
01
Curtains Up
0:30
$0.49
02
White America
5:25
$0.79
03
Business
4:12
$0.79
04
Cleanin' Out My Closet
4:58
$0.79
05
Square Dance
5:24
$0.79
06
The Kiss
1:16
$0.49
07
Soldier
3:46
$0.79
08
Say Goodbye Hollywood
4:33
$0.79
09
Drips
4:46
$0.79
10
Without Me
4:50
$0.79
11
Paul Rosenberg
0:23
$0.49
12
Sing For The Moment
5:40
$0.79
13
Superman
5:50
$0.79
14
Hailie's Song
5:21
$0.79
15
Steve Berman
0:33
$0.49
16
When The Music Stops
4:29
$0.79
17
Say What You Say
5:10
$0.79
18
'Till I Collapse
4:58
$0.79
19
My Dad's Gone Crazy
4:27
$0.79
20
Curtains Close
1:01
$0.49
Album Information
EXPLICIT

Total Tracks: 20   Total Length: 77:32

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Wondering Sound

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Jayson Greene

Managing Editor

Jayson Greene is Managing Editor at Wondering Sound and a contributing editor and columnist at Pitchfork. His writing has also appeared in GQ, the Village Voice...more »

11.16.10
When forward motion becomes impossibl
2002 | Label: Aftermath

After The Marshall Mathers LP, there was nowhere left for Eminem to build but up. Every major pop artist hits this point in their career sooner or later — the point at which forward motion becomes impossible — but Eminem had the misfortune of hitting it sooner than most. He responded as most artists in his position do: with a bigger, darker, more grandiose version of his most definitive work. The Eminem Show is nominally… read more »

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Great!

Apb

Love the songs, but what happened to RELAPSE and RECOVERY

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eMusic Features

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Icon: Eminem

By Jayson Greene, Managing Editor

Every rapper has a pseudonym or five, and every major pop star has toyed with an "alter ego." But no one turned those personalities into a bloody Cuisinart blur like Marshall Mathers, aka Eminem, aka Slim Shady. In his hands, identity was more than a branding exercise: It was a thrilling, high-stakes card game. When he lost control of it, it nearly devoured him whole, and he emerged from the resulting depression and drug addiction… more »

0

Icon: Eminem

By Jayson Greene, Managing Editor

Every rapper has a pseudonym or five, and every major pop star has toyed with an "alter ego." But no one turned those personalities into a bloody Cuisinart blur like Marshall Mathers, aka Eminem, aka Slim Shady. In his hands, identity was more than a branding exercise: It was a thrilling, high-stakes card game. When he lost control of it, it nearly devoured him whole, and he emerged from the resulting depression and drug addiction… more »

0

Hey Ma: Maureen Yancey Remembers Her Son, J Dilla

By Hua Hsu, Contributor

There's a disarming effervescence to Maureen Yancey as she shares memories of her late son, the Detroit producer and rapper J. Dilla. It has been over three years since Dilla passed away from complications related to lupus, yet she speaks of him as though he were still a constant source of amusement and inspiration. When asked if Dilla ever tried her seemingly infinite patience, she laughs: "Of course he made me very mad. For a… more »

They Say All Music Guide

It’s all about the title. First time around, Eminem established his alter ego, Slim Shady — the character who deliberately shocked and offended millions, turning Eminem into a star. Second time at bat, he turned out The Marshall Mathers LP, delving deeper into his past while revealing complexity as an artist and a personality that helped bring him an even greater audience and much, much more controversy. Third time around, it’s The Eminem Show — a title that signals that Eminem’s public persona is front and center, for the very first time. And it is, as he spends much of the album commenting on the media circus that dominated on his life ever since the release of Marshall Mathers. This, of course, encompasses many, many familiar subjects — his troubled childhood; his hatred of his parents; his turbulent relationship with his ex-wife, Kim (including the notorious incident when he assaulted a guy who allegedly kissed her — the event that led to their divorce); his love of his daughter, Hailie; and, of course, all the controversy he generated, notably the furor over his alleged homophobia and his scolding from Lynne Cheney, which leads to furious criticism about the hypocrisy of America and its government. All this is married to a production very similar to that of its predecessor — spare, funky, fluid, and vibrant, punctuated with a couple of ballads along the way. So, that means The Eminem Show is essentially a holding pattern, but it’s a glorious one — one that proves Eminem is the gold standard in pop music in 2002, delivering stylish, catchy, dense, funny, political music that rarely panders (apart from a power ballad “Dream On” rewrite on “Sing for the Moment” and maybe the sex rap “Drips,” that is). Even if there is little new ground broken, the presentation is exceptional — Dre never sounds better as a producer than when Eminem pushes him forward (witness the stunning oddity “Square Dance,” a left-field classic with an ominous waltz beat) and, with three albums under his belt, Eminem has proven himself to be one of the all-time classic MCs, surprising as much with his delivery as with what he says. Plus, the undercurrent of political anger — not just attacking Lynne Cheney, but raising questions about the Bush administration — gives depth to his typical topics, adding a new, spirited dimension to his shock tactics as notable as the deep sentimental streak he reveals on his odes to his daughter. Perhaps the album runs a little too long at 20 songs and 80 minutes and would have flowed better if trimmed by 25 minutes, but that’s a typical complaint about modern hip-hop records. Fact is, it still delivers more great music than most of its peers in rock or rap, and is further proof that Eminem is an artist of considerable range and dimension. – Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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