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Believers Never Die - Greatest Hits

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Believers Never Die - Greatest Hits album cover
01
Dead On Arrival
3:15
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02
Grand Theft Autumn / Where Is Your Boy
3:12
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03
Saturday
3:37
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04
Sugar, We're Goin Down
3:52
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05
Dance, Dance
3:00
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06
A Little Less Sixteen Candles, A Little More "Touch Me"
2:49
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07
This Ain't A Scene, It's An Arms Race
3:32
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08
Thnks fr th Mmrs
3:23
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09
"The Take Over, The Breaks Over"
3:33
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10
I'm Like A Lawyer With The Way I'm Always Trying To Get You Off (Me & You)
3:31
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11
Beat It
3:50
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12
I Don't Care
3:38
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13
America's Suitehearts
3:40
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14
What A Catch, Donnie
4:57
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15
Alpha Dog
3:42
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16
"From Now On We Are Enemies"
3:36
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17
Yule Shoot Your Eye Out
3:41
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18
Growing Up
2:54
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 18   Total Length: 63:42

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They Say All Music Guide

Appearing a mere four years after “Sugar, We’re Goin Down” turned Fall Out Boy into genuine rock stars, and covering a mere four albums, 2009’s Believers Never Die: The Greatest Hits smacks of a contractual obligation or a rush holiday treat: something to close out a contract or get a piece of product into stores during the Christmas season. Regardless of the motivation, Believers Never Die winds up as a surprisingly addictive hits record, a hyper-charged testament to Fall Out Boy’s grandiosely self-deprecating, self-aware emo-pop. Taking loud fast rules to a stylized extreme, Believers Never Die cuts away any remnants of slow songs — the acoustic guitars and lack of drums on “Yule Shoot Your Eyes Out,” one of four new songs or rarities, gives the illusion that it’s slower than it is — FOB pile up hooks and words with a smirky abandon, the sincerity of singer Patrick Stump and sarcasm of bassist/lyricist Pete Wentz tied together by a shared love of arena punk: guitars from Van Halen, melodies from Queen, outlook from the alt-rock revolution. Their Gen-Y sensibilities — not just the ceaseless snark and “I Love the ‘80s” name-drops, but their love of brick-walled production — can alienate old guys over 30, but give Believers Never Die a little time; the hooks burrow deep and Fall Out Boy seem like one of the quintessential mainstream rock singles bands of the 2000s. – Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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