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The Big Black and The Blue

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (193 ratings)
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The Big Black and The Blue album cover
01
In The Morning
2:36
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02
Hard Believer
3:41
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03
Sailor Song
2:44
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04
Waltz For Richard
2:49
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05
Heavy Storm
3:22
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06
Ghost Town
4:47
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07
Josefin
3:32
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08
A Window Opens
4:22
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09
Winter Is All Over You
3:40
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10
I Met Up With The King
2:49
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11
Wills Of The River
4:19
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 38:41

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Wondering Sound

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Laura Leebove

Deputy Editor

Laura Leebove is a Michigan-born, Brooklyn-based writer, editor, blogger, and voracious consumer of media, food, and music. She's also the home cook behind the

01.24.10
A little sincerity goes a long way
2010 | Label: Wichita Recordings / Republic Of Music

Swedish sisters Johanna and Klara Söderberg — aka First Aid Kit — write songs beyond their teenage years. The headline on their MySpace page reads, "We aim for the hearts, not the charts!" and it's that sweet earnestness, sung in reedy two-part harmonies, that drives their debut LP The Big Black And The Blue. The record's 11 folk tracks are filled with waltzes in 3/4 and 6/8, often about love, spirituality and living life to… read more »

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The Big Black and Blue

TonyMac

A very appealing CD. Stunning harmonies. Touching moving music with melodies that while not immediately accessible get under your skin after a few listens and won't let go. They have a child like innocence and sincerity about the music they produce. Well worth a listen and will reward you. Give it time though before you rush to judgement. Certainly recommended.

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Wow. What amazing voices

Billsen

Fantastic emotion and power.

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fabulous

mazza

The short clips playable from the emusic page do not do this album justice. Haunting and powerful. Play loud :-)

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Starting out

Ole'rustyrocks

This was always going to be a fascinating record, with out going down the tender age route it is a startling debut. flawed as it may be at times, and the flaws are few and endearing, it is emminantly worth downloading. At a guess what comes next will be mind lbowing!

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They Say All Music Guide

Suburban Stockholm’s Söderberg sisters put their best foot forward on this, their first full-length outing as First Aid Kit: the album opens nearly a cappella, with a few slow strums and then a full minute of nothing but the haunting close harmonies that are the duo’s strongest and most distinctive musical asset. In the 40-odd minutes that follow, the sisters’ simplistic, repetitious song structures may start to grow stale, and their fine but unfussy folk instrumentalism may seem less than inspiring, but those harmonies are never far from hand, ensuring that The Big Black and the Blue is never less than an entirely pleasant listening experience. And it has potential to be much more than that — taken individually, many and even most of these tunes have ample charms to offer, among them the sweetly melodic “Waltz for Richard,” the wistful “Heavy Storm,” and the intriguing “I Met Up with the King” (which bears a striking resemblance to Neko Case). Taken as a whole album, though, the songs lose a lot of their distinctiveness, and the uninterrupted loveliness can start to feel oddly dreary. The Big Black certainly doesn’t dash the promise suggested by the duo’s Drunken Trees EP (which in its final form was only four songs and 14 minutes shorter than this album) – although that release’s mild, playful experimentalism and small inklings of stylistic range are scrapped here for a more sober-minded American folk traditionalism that’s perhaps commendable but not altogether compelling — but it leaves that promise yet to be completely fulfilled. It feels entirely probable that they’ll get there: the Söderbergs are still (astonishingly) young — 20 and 17 at the time of this album’s release — and they’ve shown clear evidence of their raw talent and artistry. Their level of engagement is admirable: in addition to their genuinely prodigious vocal gifts and their more than competent handling all of the varied instrumentation here, save for the drums on several tracks, the sisters are credited with co-production and mixing, and they’re also responsible for album’s stunning, antiquarian-styled artwork. If they want to secure their place in this young century’s burgeoning classicist folk wave (see also: Laura Marling, the Tallest Man on Earth), they’ll merely need to come up with some songs that can truly make good on their otherwise considerably distinguished overall package. – K. Ross Hoffman

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