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Fleet Foxes

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (568 ratings)
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Fleet Foxes album cover
01
Sun It Rises
3:14
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02
White Winter Hymnal
2:29
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03
Ragged Wood
5:09
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04
Tiger Mountain Peasant Song
3:31
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05
Quiet Houses
3:34
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06
He Doesn't Know Why
3:23
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07
Heard Them Stirring
3:04
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08
Your Protector
4:12
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09
Meadowlarks
3:14
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10
Blue Ridge Mountains
4:28
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11
Oliver James
3:24
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 39:42

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Write a Review 14 Member Reviews

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All time favorite Fleet album

robertb66

Even my 8 year old daughter fell in love with these songs. The song writing and their signature sound takes you to very special places musically.

user avatar

Great Harmony

TeeLee

Though not earth shaking or life changing, this album is well worth the download. Pleasing harmonies and intelligent lyrics are always enjoyable. Well-crafted music never goes out of fashion and grows more meaningful with listening. To criticize something for having been done before is meaningless. It's like saying we shouldn't listen to Tony Bennett because we've hear Frank Sinatra.

user avatar

crosby, stills, and trash

princepatty

skip the derivation and get a crosby, stills, and nash record.

user avatar

Foxes...not...fleeting...

sewbizar

Love at first listen! Fleet Foxes is true Indie-Folk to the core. The talents of all the band members is utilized fully. The skillful, heartfelt writing of Robin Pecknold comes from a man who is expressive and genuine. I for one; being a child of the '60s appreciate young artists who value that era and are brave enough to revive it so skillfully. Bravo!

user avatar

Loosen up your wig, please.

SavagePopster

As some have indicated here already, what people respond to in this work isn't really hard to identify—pretty harmonies and melodies within full, rich arrangements. Isn't that enough of a cause for pleasure or even infatuation? Are we that sour and disaffected? Are we that old?

user avatar

I don't.....

swta56

I do not get the appeal of this ..... It is not that it is bad it has just been done before and is rather boring...

user avatar

Why?

Kurzbein

Why the appeal? Simple. It's good melodies, good harmonies and good singing. Since when is that are those things considered flaws in music?

user avatar

the fox emperor has no clothes

pss

Please can someone explain why (to me)the bland regressive sound of Fleet Foxes has captured so many. I feel like this has redefined the genre of middle-of-the-road, hand-clapping music. Maybe I'll wake up in a few years and get it, but thankfully I'll have time to catch them - as I hear their reunion tour is already being planned to fill the venues that are playing Mamma Mia today.

user avatar

Definition of a new genre

Jeff415

It's easy to pick out the inspirations and influences of Fleet Foxes, but they have the very rare gift of transfiguring them into something completely new. This album is going to be relevant for a very long time. Start to finish, every track is a gem of songwriting, storytelling, and instrumentation- not to mention those extremely rich vocal harmonies that evoke the best of the Beach Boys and the song structures of the most confident Brian Wilson when he was out on a limb and didn't care. Absolutely gorgeous.

eMusic Features

1

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By Laura Studarus, Contributor

When they were 14, Jófríður and Ásthildur started a band for no other reason than it seemed like fun. However, the twin sisters never anticipated Pascal Pinon would be anything more than an enjoyable after-school activity. "We're so super shy," says, Jófríður laughing while recounting the horror of their first concert. "We couldn't stand, we had to sit down. My feet were shaking tremendously! I could barely speak between songs." Now 18 and on the cusp… more »

0

Who Are…Dry the River

By Annie Zaleski, Contributor

The five members of Dry the River cut their teeth playing in punk bands in the south of England. However, even after vocalist Peter Liddle moved to London to study medicine, he never lost his passion for music; in fact, the people he turned to when it came time to record a demo were those same mates from his hardcore days. Much to the young band's surprise, things took off fast: Formed in 2009, they… more »

0

Six Degrees of Fleet Foxes’ Helplessness Blues

By Andy Beta, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Fleet Foxes’ Helplessness Blues

By Andy Beta, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Who Are…Mountain Man

By Sean Fennessey, Contributor

There is a scene in the Coen brothers' goofy dust bowl sendup of The Odyssey, O Brother Where Art Thou, where George Clooney, John Turturro and Tim Blake Nelson's characters, all escaped chain gang-ers, are tempted into the river by three sweet-singing sirens. Hearing Made The Harbor, the debut album by another trio of sirens, these from Vermont, is not unlike the seduction of Clooney. The sound is the same — the voices of Molly… more »