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1983

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (210 ratings)
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1983 album cover
01
1983
5:10
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02
Sao Paulo
2:08
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03
Bad Actors
1:28
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04
Orbit Brazil
2:40
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05
Shifty
1:28
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06
Babble
0:53
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07
Pet Monster Shotglass
6:39
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08
Hello
2:48
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09
Untitled #7
3:22
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10
Unexpected Delight (Feat. Laura Darlington)
3:22
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11
1983 (Daedelus's Odd-Dance Party Remix)
3:55
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 33:53

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Wondering Sound

Review 0

Hua Hsu

Contributor

Hua Hsu edits the hip-hop section of URB Magazine and writes about music, culture and politics for Slate, the Village Voice, The Wire and various other magazine...more »

12.13.06
Flying Lotus, 1983
2006 | Label: Plug Research / The Orchard

The first two minutes of Steven Ellison's 2006 debut provide a fantastic introduction to the shape of things to come. Faint, spooky murmurs and whizzing flying saucers clear a path for a simple yet bewitching 8-bit melody. Ellison is best known, depending on your personal canon, either as a composer for Adult Swim or as Alice Coltrane's great-nephew, and these two seemingly disparate sensibilities converge and collide throughout the wide-ranging 1983. "Bad Actors" teeters and… read more »

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The Shape of Things to Come

Shinzakura

Lots of reviewers have said that Flying Lotus' first album only gives a hint of what's to come later in his career. They're right. The weakest (to date) of his releases, that's not a slam but the simple truth of someone growing into his skill, a formidable talent seen later in Los Angeles and Cosmogramma.

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Not as good as I'd hoped

Jeb

I think I had hoped that this would be a good companion to Thes One's Lifestyle Marketing, but it's not as funky/groovy/digable. Good ambient music though.

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Review by Robert Celli

Garaputo

After reading a lot of the hype surrounding the recent release of Flying Lotus’ (aka Steven Ellison) “Los Angeles”, I decided to go back to his 2006 recording “1983” as a primer. Flying Lotus’ music is comprised of bleeps, glitches, and fuzz, most seemingly generated from a Casio keyboard circa 1983. His inspiration seems to be divined as much from Atari 2600 as Aphex Twin. While the “skip beat’ stagger of most of the tracks give Flying Lotus a signature sound, it feels like ambient wallpaper. There is nothing very compelling about “1983”. Comparisons to J-Dilla seem unwarranted other than both are lo-fi aficionados. “1983” would be better suited to background music in a trendy wine bar than a club. In the sub-genre obsessed universe of electronica, Flying Lotus may be an Indie darling but to these ears there is little to celebrate.

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yeah Flylo is dope!

turb0slapper

i went to a show here in SF to see prefuse73. but little did i know, i was about to have my wig blown back out front on the sidewalk where flying lotus was playin. when i got out there, everyone looked like that guy from raiders of the lost arc. you know, with the glasses? face meltin' off? i bugged. i met this dude a few times as well. its always nice when an artist you dig ends up being a real nice cat. lookin forward to much more illness from this fella!!

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WHA??!?!?

MRMCQUAY

Where did this come from?!?!?! Out of the nowhere, out of the blue comes this lil gem that bangs from here to South Africa. Nothing but avant garde, gourmet break beats au gratin here. Cop it, it's worth the downloads.

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Love it...

JG-ME

It's like a dirty little Princess.

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FLYLO

619

true left coast genius....

eMusic Features

0

Interview: Flying Lotus

By Michael Tedder, Contributor

Flying Lotus has Brilliant Young Iconoclast written all over him, which is part of his problem. He's one of the buzziest young artists on one of the buzziest labels around (electronic music and art-rock tastemakers Warp); he's tight with Thom Yorke; he's the nephew of avant-jazz icon Alice Coltrane. But even more importantly, he made Cosmogramma, a head-rush of layered bass rumbles and mournful synth ripples that slowly became a word-of-mouth phenomena beyond the Warp… more »

0

25 Bands to See at Coachella 2012

By Wondering Sound Staff, Contributor

There is every other music festival and then there is Coachella, the California-desert weekend that, in many ways, set the template for all that followed. The first U.S. festival to boast big-ticket reunions and all-over-the-map booking, Coachella continues to maintain its distinctive, idiosyncratic personality. Needless to say, navigating such a wide array of music can be tricky. We've picked 25 acts worth making time for. more »

They Say All Music Guide

Flying Lotus (or Alice Coltrane’s great-nephew) proves that Plug Research is the perfect home for him with his debut full-length, 1983. Sounding like a mix between Ammoncontact and Dntel, Lotus layers spacy keyboards over bass-heavy beats, clearly very much influenced by the whole free jazz-based electronica and hip-hop Sa-Ra craziness that’s prevalent in the L.A. area (he also takes a cue from Stones Throw producers Madlib and J Dilla, using fractured rhythms and subtle chords to propel the songs forward). However, unlike many of his labelmates, Lotus doesn’t drag out his pieces; instead, all but two of them fall neatly under four minutes, keeping 1983 from becoming a masturbatory exercise in keyboard lines and instead making it very listenable, with beats that circle around without becoming predictable, pulling jazz and Brazilian rhythms into his own electronic-based production and creating a very coherent and listenable album. The individual songs are good — especially “Pet Monster Shotglass,” which, even though it clocks in at over six minutes, stays fresh and fun with its wet, sloshing beats, like rubber boots in mud, a kind of Plug Research interpretation of G-funk — but it’s the entire record that has the greatest effect. It’s controlled and circular but also very warm and expressive, able to have fun, to not take itself too seriously. The closer, the Daedelus remix of the title cut, is almost video game-worthy, with quirky keys, neo-polka drums, and unintelligible arcade-esque vocal synths that dance around energetically. 1983 represents the best of what Plug Research and the entire genre is: intelligent, accessible, jazz-based electronica and left-field hip-hop that never fail to provoke listeners while also, and maybe more importantly, entertaining them simultaneously. – Marisa Brown

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