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Heartsongs

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Heartsongs album cover
01
Man I Love
8:33
$0.49
02
Fall
3:32
$0.49
03
Lullabye
6:16
$0.49
04
Free for Three
3:13
$0.49
05
Heartsong
5:07
$0.49
06
Infant Eyes
7:36
$0.49
07
Beam Me Up
4:26
$0.49
08
I Mean You
4:31
$0.49
09
Evanessence
5:34
$0.49
10
Rain Waltz
7:00
$0.49
11
Sphinx
3:39
$0.49
Album Information

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 59:27

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eMusic Features

0

Fred Hersch: The Lives of a Cat

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

The pianist heard on the newly released 2001 solo recital Fred Hersch Plays Jobim may be the best-known Fred Hersch: a consummate player of lyrical ballads, enriching their melodies and chords in subtle ways. He's a master of singing right-hand lines and impressionist harmonies that recede into the distance. Antonio Carlos Jobim composed classics like "Desafinado," "Corcovado" and "Insensatez" which helped make bossa nova a '60s fad, when he teamed up with saxophonist Stan Getz.… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Before Fred Hersch’s star rose during the 1990s, resulting in several Grammy nominations, he was quietly establishing himself as one of the most lyrical up-and-coming pianists, as he demonstrates on these 1989 studio sessions. Accompanied by bassist Michael Formanek and drummer Jeff Hirschfield, he surprises the listener right away with a fresh approach to the oft-heard standard “The Man I Love,” gliding over Hirschfield’s adept brushwork and Formanek’s soft, spacious bassline. Wayne Shorter’s “Infant Eyes” also benefits from Hersch’s minimalist approach, shimmering in an arrangement in which the leader and the bassist alternate solos. But Hersch best demonstrates his considerable gifts as a composer. “Heartsong” is a captivating work that he has sometimes played in a solo setting, though this trio version proves to be explosive. “Evanessence” is a gorgeous tribute to the late Bill Evans, with a superb solo by Formanek reminiscent of Scott LaFaro’s fleet performances with Evans. Although Fred Hersch has made released many memorable CDs since this Sunnyside release, this fine effort is also well worth investigating. – Ken Dryden

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