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Repeater (Plus 3 Songs)

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (613 ratings)
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Repeater (Plus 3 Songs) album cover
01
Turnover
4:15
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02
Repeater
3:01
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03
Brendan No. 1
2:32
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04
Merchandise
2:58
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05
Blueprint
3:52
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06
Sieve-Fisted Find
3:24
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07
Greed
1:47
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08
Two Beats Off
3:28
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09
Styrofoam
2:35
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10
Reprovisional
2:17
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11
Shut the Door
4:59
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12
Song No. 1
2:54
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13
Joe No. 1
3:01
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14
Break-In
1:32
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 14   Total Length: 42:35

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Write a Review 11 Member Reviews

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best one

okfuskee

Great album to start with

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Very Important stuff.

Venusfly9108

This is not your typical punk or post hardcore band, as a matter of fact, try finding one that could pull off what these guys are doing. This band show a lot of energy almost similar to hardcore bands and they also show great musicianship all the while being pretty experimental. The bassist is really in rhythm with the drumming, especially the guitars, in a way I've not ever heard in other punk bands. Okay, there are a few boring and annoying songs here and there, but for the most part, this album is just amazing. Just listen to the songs Repeater and Merchandise and if you like that stuff, then get this album.

user avatar

Actually...

hcj32

Bands like Fugazi, Rites Of Spring, Jawbox etc. were the start of "emo" in it's ORIGINAL form. The trade marked "emo" cr*p that floods our sorry excuse for a music scene today isnt true "emo" at all.. it's cr*p a** pop music for teenage girls. Revolution Summer 1985, that is where real post hc/emotional hc started. Hardcore kids that were sick of playing the same pissed vocal 3 chord songs and took a more mature "emo"tional approach to the style. How can you say Rites Of Spring is emotional hardcore and Fugazi isnt??? Guy Picciotto was playing guitar and singing in both Rites Of Spring and Fugazi. It's in his vocal style. He brought the emotional side with intensity while Mackaye brought the punk/hardcore edge to the band. I've seen Fugazi live a few times and to really appreciate them you need to see them live. However I do feel Fugazi is better musically than ROS but the two arent all that different. Both are classic bands that made classic records.

user avatar

best fugazi song is on here...

DigitalHobo

...and it's Song #1. kthxbai.

user avatar

Leading the way Post-Hardcore

conorbendle

First thing's first: THIS IS NOT AN EMO RECORD! Not only does it sound nothing like My Chemical Romance or whatever prefab, made-up, sub-goth wannabe band you associate with the 'emo' label, it isn't even an old school 'emotional hardcore' record like Rites Of Spring. What it is, is righteous forward-thinking punk rock, with brilliant heartfelt songs played with exceptional skill. So once again: ABSOLUTELY NOT FOR EMO FANS. For fans of awesome music only. I had 'Blueprint' on repeat once for about ten times. It's that kind of record.

user avatar

Where emo started

Petzbrooklyn

Ian the mastermind behind todays emo movement. THANKS. (if your not 14 years old and care about labels then you shouldn't be listening to music to begin with.)

user avatar

Fugazi at their finest

DonnM38

Don't buy into anything swiftus says about Fugazi. No f'n way is anyone in Fugazi responsible for the emo movement. If you like solid music that actually means something and isn't pumped out of corporate America check out Fugazi. It's some of the most powerful music you'll ever listen to. Some of my favorite bands are Crowbar, Obituary, and Fugazi. If that f'd up combination doesn't point you in the direction of this album and Fugazi nothing will.

user avatar

Where emo started.

swiftus

Ian the mastermind behind todays emo movement. THANKS.

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incredible

mtat76

I was turned onto Fugazi around 1992. After 15 years, I still go nuts listening to this album. With this effort, I think that Ian and the gang seem to have hit their stride. These rhythym heavy songs show a sophistication matched only by innovators such as The Minutemen. Although this is my favorite Fugazi album, I would recommend 13 songs as the introduction to this band.

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dito

scorpiusmeow

no weak links on this one. solid fugazi.

eMusic Features

0

Icon: Fugazi

By Joe Gross, Contributor

"Beautiful, funny people. Generous to and respectful of the people they work with. Inspirational in a lot of ways. Maybe the best band." - Steve Albini on Fugazi From their first public performances in 1987 to the start of their indefinite hiatus in 2002, Fugazi kept every promise they ever made. The D.C. supergroup - Dischord Records co-founder and Minor Threat frontman Ian MacKaye on guitar and vocals, singer/guitarist Guy Picciotto and drummer Brendan Canty, both… more »

0

Icon: Fugazi

By Joe Gross, Contributor

"Beautiful, funny people. Generous to and respectful of the people they work with. Inspirational in a lot of ways. Maybe the best band." - Steve Albini on Fugazi From their first public performances in 1987 to the start of their indefinite hiatus in 2002, Fugazi kept every promise they ever made. The D.C. supergroup - Dischord Records co-founder and Minor Threat frontman Ian MacKaye on guitar and vocals, singer/guitarist Guy Picciotto and drummer Brendan Canty, both… more »

They Say All Music Guide

With its righteous disdain for capitalism and the almighty dollar, Repeater sounds like an angrier American update of Gang of Four’s Solid Gold, which had been made ten years earlier. Lines/slogans like “When I need something/I reach out and grab it,” “You are not what you own,” “I was caught with my hand in the till,” and “Everything is greed” bear this out. Though not lacking any sense of conviction, Repeater honestly gets a little stifling. It’s not too difficult to see why the band was allegedly lacking a sense of humor at this stage. They could have been yelling about filing their taxes; the yelling begins to fade into a din after a while. The title makes sense, if only by mistake. But — and that’s a big but — Repeater nearly matches the Fugazi and Margin Walker EPs with its musical invention and skill, spewing out another group of completely invigorating songs, which makes the subject matter and finger-pointing a little easier to swallow. Few rhythm sections of the time had the great interplay of Joe Lally and Brendan Canty. Likewise, the guitar playing and interaction of Ian MacKaye and Guy Picciotto almost always get overlooked, thanks to all the other subjects brought up when the band is talked about. A guitar magazine even rated Repeater as one of the best guitar records of the ’90s, and rightfully so. Anemic revs spiked by pig squeals (or is it a screeching train?) highlight the title track, one of the band’s finest moments. (Don’t miss MacKaye’s vicious double-tracked vocals, either.) As always, MacKaye and Picciotto’s noise-terrorism-as-guitar-joust avoids flashiness, used as much as rhythm as punctuation device. Sharp, angular, jagged, and precise. Other gnarling highlights include the preachy “Styrofoam,” the late-breaking “Sieve-Fisted Find,” and the somewhat ironic “Merchandise,” which skewers Mr. Business Owner by asking, “What could a businessman ever want more/Than to have us sucking in his store?” Plenty of fans had to suck in someone’s store to get this record, after all. [The CD version of Repeater added the 3 Songs 7" as a bonus, titled as Repeater + 3 Songs.] – Andy Kellman

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