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Steady Diet of Nothing

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (348 ratings)
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Steady Diet of Nothing album cover
01
Exit Only
3:11
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02
Reclamation
3:21
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03
Nice New Outfit
3:26
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04
Stacks
3:08
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05
Latin Roots
3:13
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06
Steady Diet
3:42
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07
Long Division
2:12
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08
Runaway Return
3:58
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09
Polish
3:38
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10
Dear Justice Letter
3:27
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11
KYEO
2:58
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 36:14

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Wondering Sound

Review 8

Joe Gross

Contributor

Joe Gross hails from Falls Church, VA, one of the Chocolate City's most vanilla suburbs. He has written for Spin, Rolling Stone, the Village Voice, the Washingt...more »

07.26.11
Fugazi, Steady Diet of Nothing
Label: Dischord Records

A divisive record, Steady Diet is seen as either a fan favorite or Fugazi’s least-loved LP. Attempting to produce themselves, the quartet created a weirdly flat, bone-dry recording, an on-off binary between open silence and shattering noise. A few tracks are among the band’s very best — “Reclamation” became a punk pro-choice anthem (MacKaye’s “CARRY MY BODY” scream is a knife wound), “Runaway Return” articulates the inner turmoil of the upper-middle class punk, while “Latin… read more »

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bitchin

FurryAligator

I dont use fancy words when a word like Bitchin shall suffice. I love fugazi they simply rule

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intergal...

patrickmjames

A curious Fugazi record, Steady Diet is nothing if not quintessential. It contains my favorite moment of oblique lyrical grandstanding--"America is just a word, but I use it"--and nicely plays with rhythm, drive, and restraint from start to finish.

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Blimey they were angry

drewbie1

And it made for great music. This plus 13 Songs is all the Fugazi you need really.

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Brilliant

engineroom

Great to listen to on the way to yer nans funeral

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you must have it.

pansyboy

that sums it up. this is a must have record.word.

eMusic Features

0

Icon: Fugazi

By Joe Gross, Contributor

"Beautiful, funny people. Generous to and respectful of the people they work with. Inspirational in a lot of ways. Maybe the best band." - Steve Albini on Fugazi From their first public performances in 1987 to the start of their indefinite hiatus in 2002, Fugazi kept every promise they ever made. The D.C. supergroup - Dischord Records co-founder and Minor Threat frontman Ian MacKaye on guitar and vocals, singer/guitarist Guy Picciotto and drummer Brendan Canty, both… more »

0

Icon: Fugazi

By Joe Gross, Contributor

"Beautiful, funny people. Generous to and respectful of the people they work with. Inspirational in a lot of ways. Maybe the best band." - Steve Albini on Fugazi From their first public performances in 1987 to the start of their indefinite hiatus in 2002, Fugazi kept every promise they ever made. The D.C. supergroup - Dischord Records co-founder and Minor Threat frontman Ian MacKaye on guitar and vocals, singer/guitarist Guy Picciotto and drummer Brendan Canty, both… more »

They Say All Music Guide

From the opening swarms of “Exit Only,” you can tell Steady Diet of Nothing will differ from Fugazi’s earlier records. Repeater’s excellence can’t be denied, but the band stood in danger of stagnating its sound. To its benefit, Fugazi made some changes, employing more herk-a-jerk rhythms and dub influences, and changing up the lyrical focus. Actually, the lyrics get a bit vague — bordering on equivocality at times — which has its advantages and disadvantages. With Steady Diet, Fugazi get more economical and less forceful. Though not nearly as neck-gnawing as Repeater, Steady Diet still packs a sizable wallop, but with slower tempos and less deliberate instrumentation. As always, a poison-tipped dart is pointed at the government, media, and major entertainment outlets. Ian MacKaye’s “destroy your television” rant on “Polish” is one of the more direct and simple songs. His “KYEO” comes straight from the rice paddy or homefront, depending on interpretation. It urges the listener to always remain aware, whether awaiting the enemy’s next battle move or remaining blissfully unaware of how people can be taken advantage of by others. As with the rest of the band’s catalog, lyrics are provided in the booklet. This makes things much easier on the intent listener, as both Picciotto and MacKaye have weird voices that become unintelligible when howled over their instrumental din. The lyric sheet is most useful on Picciotto’s “Latin Roots.” He’s not warning you that “it’s time to meet Jamaicans,” as it sounds, but rather “it’s time to meet your makers.” Not quite lending itself to “Purple Haze”-like levels of butchery, but important to point out nonetheless. – Andy Kellman

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