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Maggot Brain

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (782 ratings)

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Maggot Brain album cover
01
Maggot Brain
10:21  
02
Can You Get to That
2:51
$0.49
03
Hit It and Quit It
3:51
$0.49
04
You and Your Folks, Me and My Folks
3:38
$0.49
05
Super Stupid
4:01
$0.49
06
Back in Our Minds
2:40
$0.49
07
Wars of Armageddon
9:47
$0.49
08
Whole Lot of BS
2:13
$0.49
09
I Miss My Baby
5:05
$0.49
10
Maggot Brain [Alt Mix]
9:35
$0.49
Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 10   Total Length: 54:02

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Wondering Sound

Review 0

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Greg Tate

Contributor

04.22.11
A classic featuring maybe the greatest guitar solo ever.
Label: Westbound Records / Alpha Pup

From George Clinton's own mouth, I was told Eddie Hazel dropped that traumatic solo on "Maggot Brain" in one take after George told mama's boy Eddie to imagine he'd been told his mother was dead and then found out it wasn't true. Now that's what we call record producing! Bob Rock, take note — instead of spending one year in therapy with your uninspired band, just say some shit that will send them intoread more »

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Doesn't get any better

PerfectPitchArtists

One of my favorite albums of all time, and I only heard it about 3 years ago for the first time. Definitely timeless. From the opening title track, which is a 10-1/2 minute, LSD-inspired guitar solo, the album grips you. And "Can You Get to That," the second track, and its political themes are as resonant today -- perhaps more so -- as they were when originally released 4 decades ago. The album continues to pick up steam with tracks 3 and 4 -- "Hit It and Quit It" and "You and Your Folks, Me and My Folks" -- and leads to the climactic, driving, and literally explosive 10-minute epic closer "Wars of Armageddon." It's no wonder AMG gives the album 5 out of 5 stars. The bonus tracks -- especially "I Miss My Baby" by US Music with Funkadelic -- are great, too.

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This Album Shreds!

Collins

This album is more than just a vessel for "Maggot Brain." This is a real trip through some psychedelic, funky, noise. Even if you are not familiar with George Clinton and his projects back in the day, get this anyway, it's still fresh. "Wars of Armageddon" is especially amazing.

user avatar

classic material

j1one

This is all time classic material. Where just about every song is top level material. I remember back in the day hearing You And Your Folks played on CKLW on Windsor AM radio just outside of Detroit where Funkadelic was based. Eddie Hazel on lead guitar on Maggot Brain, You and Your Folks, Super Stupid.

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Hendrix Love Child

paanders

Eddie Hazel's epic solo on track 1 is a must have. The rest is appealingly freaky acid-soaked guitar-drven psychedelic soul. Looser, noisier, more psychotic-feeling than the good-time happy horny Parliament band.

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Track one is essential

geoffreylee

You have to have Maggot Brain.

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Guitar at its best

Paul_D

Track one - Maggot Brain is fantastic.

user avatar

Not Maybe but ABSOLUTELY

DesertDirtDog

the greatest guitar solo ever.

user avatar

it's so good...

crunchee

i want the title cut played at my funeral.

user avatar

Great album

jeffersonh

This is a great album, much of it instrumental. Interestingly, I think of it as more in the context of early 70's Miles Davis than commercial funk.

user avatar

Dude, Seriously!!!!

isaacmusicman

I really don't know what to say about this! Really if you don't like the guitar, you will love it after listening to this! I know others don't feel the same, but I am so glad that there is a clean version of "Maggot Brain" on this, that way I can just get carried away by the sway of the melody and guitar. Man! Seriously! Who didn't love this one!!!!!!!

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They Say All Music Guide

It starts with a crackle of feedback shooting from speaker to speaker and a voice intoning, “Mother Earth is pregnant for the third time, for y’all have knocked her up” and talking about rising “above it all or drown in my own sh*t.” This could only have been utterly bizarre back in 1971 and it’s no less so decades later; though the Mothership was well on its way already, Maggot Brain really helped it take off. The instrumental title track is the key reason to listen, specifically for Eddie Hazel’s lengthy, mind-melting solo. George Clinton famously told Hazel to play “like your momma had just died,” and the resulting evocation of melancholy and sorrow doesn’t merely rival Jimi Hendrix’s work, but arguably bests a lot of it. Accompanied by another softer guitar figure providing gentle rhythm for the piece, the end result is simply fantastic, an emotional apocalypse of sound. Maggot Brain is bookended by another long number, “Wars of Armageddon,” a full-on jam from the band looping in freedom chants and airport-departure announcements to the freak-out. In between are a number of short pieces, finding the collective merrily cooking up some funky stew of the slow and smoky variety. There are folky blues and gospel testifying on “Can You Get to That” (one listen and a lot of Primal Scream’s mid-’90s career is instantly explained) and wry but warm reflections on interracial love on “You and Your Folks, Me and My Folks,” its drum hits distorted to give a weird electronic edge to the results. “Super Stupid” is a particular killer, pounding drums and snarling guitar laying down the boogie hard and hot, while “Hit It and Quit It” has a great chorus and Bernie Worrell getting in a fun keyboard solo to boot. [The 2005 reissue features excellent remastered sound, a thick booklet, a B-side, U.S. Music's 1972 A-side "I Miss My Baby" (featuring Funkadelic), and the full-band mix of the title track.] – Ned Raggett

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