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Standing on the Verge of Getting It On

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Standing on the Verge of Getting It On album cover
01
Red Hot Mama
4:46
$0.49
02
Alice in My Fantasies
2:22
$0.49
03
I'll Stay
4:18
$0.49
04
Sexy Ways
2:56
$0.49
05
Standing on the Verge of Getting It On
5:07
$0.49
06
Jimmy's Got a Little Bit of Bitch in Him
2:22
$0.49
07
Good Thoughts, Bad Thoughts
9:24
$0.49
08
Vital Juices
3:14
$0.49
09
Standing on the Verge of Getting It On [Single Edit]
3:20
$0.49
Album Information

Total Tracks: 9   Total Length: 37:49

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Standing On The Verge Of Not Getting It

edmaury

Admit it. I'll Stay is the best track from this album. You r missing out on Eddie Hazels Hypnotic guitar work If u Buy track #3. Otherwise another solid rock/funk effort with a country-western twist in track #6.

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problems related to this cd version

duggie

"I'll Stay" should be 7 minutes long, not 4; "Good Thoughts, Bad Thoughts" is also 3 minutes too short; "Sexy Ways" is in a different mix. They used the wrong versions on this CD and I've heard that the label has corrected the errors for future printings. emusic people, please look into getting an updated copy, but don't remove the tracks in the meantime -- it's still good!

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hearing what your saying above, but...

Hoggins

...if you ain't got this already, get it anyway. there's a lot of funkadelic on here all of a sudden, but you got to download all you can. If you've got it already then it don't matter. You already know where it's at. If you've never heard "Ill Stay", then you don't want to be waiting until they put on the full length version...get a taste now!

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They Say All Music Guide

Expanding back out to a more all-over-the-place lineup — about 15 or so people this time out — Funkadelic got a bit more back on track with Standing on the Verge. Admittedly, George Clinton repeats a trick from America Eats Its Young via another re-recording of an Osmium track, namely leadoff cut “Red Hot Mama.” However, starting as it does with a hilarious double soliloquy (with the first voice sounding like the happier brother of Sir Nose d’Voidoffunk) and coming across with a fierce new take, it’s a good omen for Standing on the Verge as a whole. Eddie Hazel’s guitar work in particular is just plain bad-ass; after his absence from Cosmic Slop, it’s good to hear him fully back in action with Bernie Worrell, Cordell Mosson, Gary Shider, and the rest. In general, compared to the sometimes too polite Cosmic Slop, Standing on the Verge is a full-bodied, crazy mess in the best possible way, with heavy funk jams that still smoke today while making a lot of supposedly loud and dangerous rock sound anemic. Check out “Alice in My Fantasies” if a good example is needed — the whole thing is psychotic from the get-go, with vocals as much on the edge as the music — or the wacky, wonderful title track. There are quieter moments as well, but this time around with a little more bite to them, like the woozy slow jam of “I’ll Stay,” which trips out along the edges just enough while the song makes its steady way along. In an unlikely but effective turn, meanwhile, “Jimmy’s Got a Little Bit of Bitch in Him” is a friendly, humorous song about a gay friend; given the rote homophobia of so much later hip-hop, it’s good to hear some founding fathers have a more open-minded view. [The 2005 reissue features excellent remastered sound, a thick booklet, and tracks pulled from original Westbound singles.] – Ned Raggett

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