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On Fire

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (245 ratings)
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On Fire album cover
01
Blue Thunder
3:49
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02
Tell Me
3:53
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03
Snowstorm
5:14
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04
Strange
3:19
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05
When Will You Come Home
5:23
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06
Decomposing Trees
4:08
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07
Another Day
3:45
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08
Leave the Planet
2:43
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09
Plastic Bird
3:19
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10
Isn't It a Pity
5:14
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11
Victoria Garden
2:52
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12
Ceremony
5:58
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13
Cold Night
2:36
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 13   Total Length: 52:13

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Touchstone of my youth

quiteQuacky

This is one of those records where the moment of first hearing it (in 1989) is still so vivid in my memory that even now I'm am overcome by the smell of fresh vinyl. While the first side features two of G500's greatest "hits" ('Blue Thunder' and 'When Will You Come Home'), Side B ('Decomposing Trees' through their cover of George Harrison's 'Isn't It A Pity') ranks among the most glorious LP sides ever, in my opinion.

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They Say All Music Guide

Having already made a fine account of themselves on Today, the three members of Galaxie 500 got even better with On Fire, recording another lovely classic of late ’80s rock. As with all the band’s work, Kramer once again handles the production, the perfect person to bring out Galaxie 500′s particular approach. The combination of his continued use of reverb and the sudden, dramatic shifts in the music — never exploding, just delivering enough of a change — makes for fine results. Consider “Snowstorm,” with Krukowski’s soft-then-strong drums and Wareham’s liquid solo and how they’re placed in the mix, leading without dominating. Yang’s vocals became more prominent and her bass work more quietly narcotic than before, while Krukowski adds more heft to his playing without running roughshod over everything, even at the band’s loudest. Wareham in contrast more or less continues along, his glazed, haunting voice simply a joy to hear, while adding subtle touches in the arrangements — acoustic guitar is often prominent — to contrast his beautifully frazzled soloing. Leadoff track “Blue Thunder” is the most well-known song and deservedly so, another instance of the trio’s ability to combine subtle uplift with blissed-out melancholia, building to an inspiring ending. There’s more overt variety throughout On Fire, from the more direct loner-in-the-crowd sentiments and musical punch of “Strange” to the Yang-sung “Another Day,” a chance for her to shine individually before Wareham joins in at the end. Again, a cover makes a nod to past inspirations, with George Harrison being the songwriter of choice; his “Isn’t It a Pity” closes out the album wonderfully, Kramer adding vocals and “cheap organ.” Inspired guest appearance — Ralph Carney, Tom Waits’ horn player of choice, adding some great tenor sax to the increasing volume and drive of “Decomposing Trees.” Later CD pressings included the bonus tracks from the Blue Thunder EP. – Ned Raggett

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