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Goldie

Rate It! Avg: 3.5 (12 ratings)

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Goldie album cover
01
My Blue Tears
2:14
$0.49
02
Wynken, Blynken and Nood
2:33
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03
Butterfly
3:22
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04
Uncle Pen
2:43
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05
The House Song
4:06
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06
I'll Be Your Baby Tonight
3:03
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07
Carey
2:50
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08
Cloudy Summer Afternoon
2:50
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09
Ring Bell
3:01
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10
I Wanna Woo You
2:31
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11
Pasadena
2:57
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 32:10

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Wondering Sound

Review 0

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Glenn Kenny

Contributor

04.22.11
Flower child actress gives singing a try.
2004 | Label: DRG Records

Given the dippy flower child persona Goldie Hawn was still getting mileage out of in 1972 when she made this album, the full-bodied quality of her voice is kind of surprising; she doesn't sound so much like a blonde Betty Boop than a Joan Baez sans perfect pitch. The song selection skews to the country side of things, although "Butterfly" has a French chorus, which Hawn handles creditably. Too bad Serge Gainsbourg never looked… read more »

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Goldie

Wendyjo

You are SUCH a good actress--stick with it!

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You might be disappointed...

BarmyFotheringayPhipps

...because as it turns out, this album is nowhere near as awful as you might expect it to be. The production isn't gloppy and sweet, the choice of material is actually pretty good, and most surprisingly, Goldie Hawn actually has a perfectly serviceable singing voice. If you're looking for kitschy Golden Throats stuff, you might not be too pleased, but if you have an interest (however embarrassed you might be about it) in early '70s soft pop, this is fairly entertaining.

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They Say All Music Guide

It’s a tragedy of pop culture in the new millennium that starlets don’t rush willy-nilly into the recording studio anywhere near as much as they used to. Goldie Hawn’s sole foray into pop music — originally released in 1972 on Warner Bros. after Laugh-In but before Steven Spielberg’s Sugarland Express revealed her dramatic range as an actress — isn’t Golden Throats-level bad, surely to the disappointment of hipsters everywhere. Although Hawn’s helium-pitched voice is a trifle thin and limited, the selection of material wisely plays to her strengths, with Dolly Parton’s “My Blue Tears” and — believe it or not — Joni Mitchell’s “Carey” both well-suited to her soprano vocals. In fact, the only really egregious errors aren’t really her fault: the Frenchified “Butterfly,” with its absurdly cheesy choral backing, wouldn’t have sounded good sung by anybody, and the countrified take on Van Morrison’s “I Wanna Roo You” has a botched arrangement that slaps on a vaguely oompah-style waltz-time arrangement that suits neither singer nor song. Other than that, though, Goldie is a sweetly endearing country-tinged middle of the road pop record of a style that just isn’t being made anymore. – Stewart Mason

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