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Kerplunk

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (22 ratings)

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Kerplunk album cover
01
2000 Light Years Away
2:24  
02
One for the Razorbacks
2:30  
03
Welcome to Paradise
3:30  
04
Christie Road
3:33  
05
Private Ale
2:26  
06
Dominated Love Slave
1:41  
07
One of My Lies
2:19  
08
80
3:39  
09
Android
3:00  
10
No One Knows
3:39  
11
Who Wrote Holden Coulfield?
2:44  
12
Words I Might Have Ate
2:32  
13
Sweet Children
1:41  
14
Best Thing in Town
2:03  
15
Strangeland
2:08  
16
My Generation
2:19  
Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 16   Total Length: 42:08

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Wondering Sound

Review 0

Jon Dolan

Contributor

04.01.08
Green Day, Kerplunk
Label: Epitaph

Kerplunk established Green Day as the premiere band on the Gilman Street scene and set the stage for their pop success. The songs are tighter and more assured, thanks in large part to the addition of agile, speed-drunk drummer Tre Cool. Armstrong's writing breaks from the one-trick thrash of the band's debut, with more dynamic surges and smartened-up songcraft. The obvious high-point, and their first great song, is "2000 Light Years Away," a riff on… read more »

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When they were fun / good

BillyShaneGuy

Excepting the last four tracks which were not part of the original release, Private Ale, and Android, this is a solid album with overtones of the direction they were heading in with Dookie (One Of My Lies and WTP). Green Day a couple of years before the Mudstock epicness.

user avatar

haha

Akto

this is the best green day album. i had it when i was twelve, does that make me young or old? anyhoo...I used to listen to this all night and wonder "what is really going on" everytime she felt like 2000 light years away. buy the cd. especially if you're 13...includes original of "welcome to paradise" worth all the riffs in gold

eMusic Features

0

Icon: Green Day

By Jon Dolan, Contributor

Green Day couldn't get critically arrested or commercially noticed when they first showed up on the Bay Area's early-'90s punk scene. But over the course of a shockingly resilient career, they've found new ways to nuance their vision of punk rock populism. Who'd have thought that the brain-drained brats of their first great record, 1991's Kerplunk, would be the band to bring open-souled thrash to the top of the charts after so many had failed… more »

0

Icon: Green Day

By Jon Dolan, Contributor

Green Day couldn't get critically arrested or commercially noticed when they first showed up on the Bay Area's early-'90s punk scene. But over the course of a shockingly resilient career, they've found new ways to nuance their vision of punk rock populism. Who'd have thought that the brain-drained brats of their first great record, 1991's Kerplunk, would be the band to bring open-souled thrash to the top of the charts after so many had failed… more »

1

Six Degrees of Green Day’s American Idiot

By Christopher R. Weingarten, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

1

Six Degrees of Green Day’s American Idiot

By Christopher R. Weingarten, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Green Day’s second full album was the perfect dry run for the band’s later assault on the mainstream, containing both more variety and more flat-out smashes than previous releases had shown. With Tre Cool now firmly in place as the drummer, the lineup was at last settled, and it turned out Cool and Mike Dirnt were a perfect rhythm section, with the former showing a bit more flash and ability than John Kiftmeyer did. Together the two throw in a variety of guitarless breaks that would later help to define the band’s sound for many — warm and never letting the beat go. As for Billie Joe Armstrong, his puppy-dog delivery and eternal switching between snotty humor and sudden sorrrow was better than ever, as were his instantly memorable riffs. The metal-strength chug that always informed the band’s best work isn’t absent either — check out Armstrong’s opening riffing on “Christie Road.” The whole thing starts with a note-perfect bang — “2000 Light Years Away” is the absolute highlight of the group’s premajor-label days, with a great chorus and classic yearning lyrics. It got buried in the wave of Dookie’s success a bit, but one other number didn’t — “Welcome to Paradise,” also a standout on that album, appears here in its original form. Rob Cavallo punched up the radio-friendly sound on the latter take, but even here it’s a treat and a half — quick, rampaging, and once again with a great stop-start chorus to spare. Other straight-up pop winners include “One of My Lies” and “Who Wrote Holden Caulfield?.” Elsewhere, Green Day slow down tempos, try acoustic numbers, and in one hilarious moment, pull off a ridiculous yet worthy country pisstake with the Cool-written “Dominated Love Slave.” [CD versions included the Sweet Children EP as a slightly surprising bonus.] – Ned Raggett

more »