|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

Bluesette (London 1979) (The Definitive Black & Blue Sessions)

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (55 ratings)
Retail
Member
Bluesette (London 1979) (The Definitive Black & Blue Sessions) album cover
01
Bluesette
5:50
$0.49
$0.99
02
Blue and Sentimental
3:13
$0.49
$0.99
03
Milt's Mood
5:25
$0.49
$0.99
04
Blues In My Heart
7:55
$0.49
$0.99
05
Things Ain't What Thet Used to Be
5:29
$0.49
$0.99
06
Azure
7:21
$0.49
$0.99
07
Down
5:21
$0.49
$0.99
08
Saint-James Infirmary
3:20
$0.49
$0.99
09
Bluesette (Take 1)
5:22
$0.49
$0.99
10
Things Ain't What They Used to Be (take 1)
5:39
$0.49
$0.99
11
Down (Take 1)
5:01
$0.49
$0.99
Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 59:56

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Write a Review 2 Member Reviews

Please register before you review a release. Register

user avatar

Elegant

Skylark

Hank Jones is the greatest. Elegant, consistantly lyrical and in so fine form in this delicious album.I play him frequently on my program"Jazz Spotlight On Sinatra" at www.live365.com/stations/nancyann3839

user avatar

I love this guy

okierambler

Classic Hank Jones session recorded in London in 1979. Full title of release is "Bluesette (The Definitive Black & Blue Sessions)."

eMusic Features

2

The Rise and Fall of Lucky Thompson

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

A few years ago, Italian saxophonist Daniele D'Agaro was visiting Chicago, and a critic friend put on a fairly obscure record to stump him. D'Agaro listened for about three seconds, said: "Lucky." Good ears. He knows the distinctive sound of Lucky Thompson after he started hanging out in Paris and playing sumptuous tenor saxophone ballads recalling old idol Don Byas's Parisian sides. On "Solitude" and "We'll Be Together Again," from Lucky in Paris 1959, his tenor's… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Hank Jones is often taken for granted because of his seemingly effortless ability at the piano, but this 1979 trio session with bassist George Duvivier and drummer Alan Dawson (both of whom are also top-flight players) finds him at the top of his game. The hard-driving opener, Toots Theilemans’ “Bluesette,” has fine solos by the leader and Duvivier, supported by Dawson’s crisp brushwork. Jones shows off his stride piano chops in a jaunty take of “Blue and Sentimental,” offers a swaggering take of “Things Ain’t What They Used to Be,” and a lush treatment of Duke Ellington’s “Azure.” But the most stunning performance of the session may very well be Jones’ moving solo rendition of “St. James Infirmary.” The Black & Blue CD reissue of the original LP adds alternate takes of three selections. Highly recommended. [A French version was also released, with three previously unreleased bonus takes.] – Ken Dryden

more »