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Flip Your Wig

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (502 ratings)
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Flip Your Wig album cover
01
Flip Your Wig
2:35
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02
Every Everything
1:58
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03
Makes No Sense At All
2:46
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04
Hate Paper Doll
1:54
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05
Green Eyes
3:02
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06
Divide And Conquer
3:47
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07
Games
4:08
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08
Find Me
4:09
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09
The Baby Song
0:47
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10
Flexible Flyer
3:02
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11
Private Plane
3:20
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12
Keep Hanging On
3:19
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13
The Wit And The Wisdom
3:42
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14
Don't Know Yet
2:18
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 14   Total Length: 40:47

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Write a Review 22 Member Reviews

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Mind Blowing...among their best!

J33

Flip Your Wig, along the Candy Apple Grey, were the first 2 Husker Du albums I heard and listened to on a regular basis and I was hooked. I think the cleaner, better production really brought out the best in HD, although I certainly appreciate Zen Arcade and New Day Rising as well. "Divide and Conquer" is my favorite HD song and remains an all-time favorite of mine, across any genre...love the sound, the fury, the riff, the beat...it's got it all. Highly recommended as is the entire HD catalogue!

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DELICIOUS

thundercurtain

Never forget listening to this for the first time (and zillionth) with my heart thumping, on vacation with family as a teenager. Masterpiece from start to finish.

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Every Everything

Pikg

The album is quite excellent as usual. On the song Every Everything they do more in under 2 minutes then most bands do in their entire careers. A very special band from a very special time.

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hopeful despair.

LeftEar

Of all the Husker Du albums, this one has the most hope and desperate energy. The songs make you feel that love is possible, or at least great sex. Not as bleak as Candy Apple Grey, nor as indie as Zen Arcade, it'€™s got a beat and you can dance to it -€“ like crazy.

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Never My Cup of Tea

EMUSIC-00C521E2

Everyone loves this one but I never did, other than the fact that it's named after the Beatles board game. Warehouse Songs and Stories was always much more my favorite of the more 'merch sounding albums. To me, the melodies on this one are kind of annoying. Maybe I'll 'get it' some day... of all the Husker albums, the "ultimate Husker Statement" as mentioned in another review is clearly not this one; it is Zen Arcade.

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The Ultimate Husker Statement

MammothMan

On this album, Grant Hart takes an equal share with Bob Mould. This is the most balanced and melodic Husker Du album. The music is not as blistering as the previous releases, hence a more slightly more tepid production. It is indispensable.

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Divide and Conquer

tide.is.level

This album is half and half, it's definitely not the fireball that is New Day Rising. This has some of Mould's most brilliant moments, including the prophetic "Divide and Conquer". "Private Plane" is where it's at. The guitar solo followed soon with a classic Husker build and barrage of radiance at the end is enough to make my heart explode. It's like skydiving through a New Year's Eve party, celebrating the last night on earth.

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This is what punk-pop is supposed to be

quiteQuacky

Hearing Zen Arcade for the first time back in the '80s was a life-changing moment... but this is the Huskers record I find myself turning to most often these days. That's principally due to the irresistable melodies and guitar textures of songs like "Green Eyes" (an all-time favorite song), "Flexible Flyer", and "Find Me" (foreshadowing 9/11?). I've always thought of this as their most 'pop' record... but it is obviously still entirely rooted in the sweaty, snarling and amazingly creative world of '80s post-punk. Seeing the 'pop-punk' label applied to countless (and far more commrecial) crappy bands in more modern times has just made me want to vomit. This is the real deal right here.

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oh, the irony.

sameoldparadise

does anybody else object to the Commercial Alternative label when they were the-band-that-shoulda-sold-a-kajillion-records but didn't + it was 1985!....alternative was still just a glint in some record executive's eye!

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Power Pop Rock at it's Best

tommoran

5 stars....The songs are all classic and this is an example of perhaps them at their peak. They were cranking out albums at this time at a fast and furious pace and the quality never suffered. Great songwriting and catchy tunes. What's not to love?

eMusic Features

0

Icon: Husker Du

By Ira Robbins, Contributor

The three monumental bands who put Minneapolis on the indie rock map in the 1980s - the Replacements, Soul Asylum and Husker Du - all found greatness along the same path, climbing out of hardcore's narrow trench with ambitions far beyond the basics of simply railing against Reagan or bitching about school and cops. Of the three, Husker Du clung most tightly to punk's visceral force, but added sensitivity, melody or depth to the roar. Bob… more »

0

Icon: Husker Du

By Ira Robbins, Contributor

The three monumental bands who put Minneapolis on the indie rock map in the 1980s - the Replacements, Soul Asylum and Husker Du - all found greatness along the same path, climbing out of hardcore's narrow trench with ambitions far beyond the basics of simply railing against Reagan or bitching about school and cops. Of the three, Husker Du clung most tightly to punk's visceral force, but added sensitivity, melody or depth to the roar. Bob… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Spot — SST’s house producer who manned the boards for Zen Arcade and New Day Rising — didn’t produce Flip Your Wig, Hüsker Dü’s second album of 1985, and the difference is immediately noticeable. Everything on Flip Your Wig is cleaner and brighter than on its two immediate predecessors, which is appropriate, considering that Bob Mould and Grant Hart have only increased their debt to ’60s pop. The hooks and melodies are on the surface, right from the kick-start call-and-response of the title track. On paper, it might sound as if Hüsker Dü have watered down their hardcore ideals, but it doesn’t play that way. Flip Your Wig is pop played as punk, as if this is the only time these songs could ever be heard. Which means Hart’s love song “Green Eyes” and Mould’s pure pop single “Makes No Sense at All” are delivered with the same rage and passion as Mould’s blistering “Divide and Conquer” and Hart’s “Keep Hanging On,” or the pair of surging, neo-psychedelic and noise-wracked instrumentals that close the album. Flip Your Wig would be a remarkable record on its own terms, but the fact that it followed New Day Rising by a matter of months and Zen Arcade by just over a year is simply astonishing. – Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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